How did the Maya transport goods and what did they trade? Discover their expertise, their impressive logistics and the daunting geography that they had to overcome. Find out how they knew about the wheel, but didn't use it. Take part in role-play trading games, make models and maps.

Session 1 Transport

Objectives

History

  • Undertake an in-depth study of a non-European society that provides contrasts with British history - The Maya civilization.
  • Regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.
  • Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.
  • Understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.

Design and Technology

  • Use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups.
  • Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design.
  • Select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to accurately perform practical tasks (for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing).

Teaching and Activities

Explore different forms of transport that the Maya had; design and make a transportation device with no wheels.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To find out how Maya people moved around.
  • To design and make a form of transport with no wheels.

Children will:

  • Understand and explain what the source reveals about the topic
  • Solve a design problem (a form of transport without wheels)
  • Work in a team to make a model

You Will Need

  • Card
  • Sticks
  • String
  • Cloth

Session 2 Trade goods

Objectives

History

  • Undertake an in-depth study of a non-European society that provides contrasts with British history- The Maya civilization.
  • Regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.
  • Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.
  • Understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.

Design and Technology

  • Use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups.
  • Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design.
  • Select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to accurately perform practical tasks (for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing).

Geography

  • Describe and understand key aspects of physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle.
  • Describe and understand key aspects of human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.

Teaching and Activities

Research the trade goods that Maya people exchanged, including cacao beans, feathers, jade, obsidian; design and make some game counters of these goods.

Teaching Objectives:

  • To find out what trade goods Maya people moved around.
  • To design gaming pieces based on goods the Maya traded.
  • To learn about the distribution of natural resources in the Maya world.

Children will:

  • Make assumptions about where natural resources could be found using maps
  • Use maps to understand the physical and human geography of a region
  • Design and make gaming pieces

You Will Need

  • Card
  • Tracing paper
  • Air-drying clay
  • Computers with Paint software or similar

Session 3 Trade routes

Objectives

History

  • Undertake an in-depth study of a non-European society that provides contrasts with British history - The Maya civilization.
  • Regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.
  • Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.
  • Understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.

Design and Technology

  • Use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups.
  • Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design.
  • Select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to accurately perform practical tasks (for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing).

Geography

  • Describe and understand key aspects of physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle.
  • Describe and understand key aspects of human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.

Teaching and Activities

Research the trade routes the Maya used and the terrain they had to cross; create a 3D model of the terrain.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To find out about Maya trade routes.
  • To design and make a game board based on the Maya world.
  • To work out how the physical geography affected the trade routes.

Children will:

  • Use digital maps to find river valleys.
  • Design and make a game board.
  • Annotate a map with physical and human geographical details.

You Will Need

  • Cardboard
  • Newspaper
  • Mod roc (or the 3D maps of the Maya world created in Block A)

Session 4 Design the game

Objectives

History

  • Undertake an in-depth study of a non-European society that provides contrasts with British history - The Maya civilization.
  • Regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.
  • Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.
  • Understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.

Design and Technology

  • Use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups.

Geography

  • Present the human and physical features using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

Teaching and Activities

Work out the rules for the game using your gaming counters, board and transportation devices.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To find out about trading and economy.
  • To work out how trade links would work in practice.

Children will:

  • Apply their historical knowledge to a strategy game.
  • Apply their geographical knowledge to a strategy game.
  • Take part in a collaborative project.

You Will Need

  • Dice
  • Digital camera
  • Cacao nibs
  • Feathers
  • Gaming pieces and boards they have already made