Explore the methods of farming practised by the Maya and some of the foods they farmed, hunted and gathered. Try making and tasting a traditional Maya hot chocolate recipe. Finish off by creating a model illustrating how the Maya produced food and having a simple Maya meal.

Session 1 Farming practices

Objectives

History

  • Undertake an in-depth study of a non-European society that provides contrasts with British history- The Maya civilization.
  • Address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.

Design and Technology

  • Understand seasonality, and know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed.

Geography

  • Describe and understand key aspects of human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.

Teaching and Activities

Children are given example landscapes, each with their own advantages and disadvantages for farming, and are asked to come up with their own solutions. Learn how the Maya farmed the same lands.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To find out how the Maya farmed their land.
  • To find out how the Maya grew crops.
  • To find out how the Maya adapted farming to the environments they lived in.

Children will:

  • Demonstrate understanding of human geography, especially land use.
  • Explain how certain plants can be processed to be eaten.
  • Explain how the Maya undertook agriculture in difficult environments.

You Will Need

  • Squash
  • Runner beans
  • Corn on the cob
  • Cacao beans
  • Chillies
  • Avocado
  • Tomatoes

Session 2 Food

Objectives

History

  • Undertake an in-depth study of a non-European society that provides contrasts with British history - The Maya civilization.
  • Address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.

Design and Technology

  • Understand seasonality, and know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed.
  • Prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques.

Geography

  • Describe and understand key aspects of human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.

Teaching and Activities

Do some research to find out what types of food the Maya had access to, either by farming, hunting or gathering. Try cooking some recipes.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To find out what the Maya people ate.
  • To try out some Maya recipes.
  • To find out what types of wild food the Maya had access to.

Children will:

  • Answer research questions about Maya food.
  • Follow a recipe.
  • Understand how wild food resources were unevenly distributed.

You Will Need

  • Cooking facilities
  • Squash
  • Runner beans
  • Corn meal
  • Cacao beans
  • Chillies
  • Cassava
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Tomatoes
  • Avocados
  • Bananas
  • Honey

Session 3 Chocolate

Objectives

History

  • Undertake an in-depth study of a non-European society that provides contrasts with British history- The Maya civilization.
  • Address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.

Design and Technology

  • Understand seasonality, and know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed.
  • Prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques.

Geography

  • Describe and understand key aspects of human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.

Teaching and Activities

Try out a traditional recipe to make Maya hot chocolate. Find out what chocolate was used for – not just drinking, but also in sauces for food and as a currency.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To find out about how Maya people used chocolate.
  • To try out a Maya chocolate recipe.
  • To find out about the environment in which chocolate grows.

Children will:

  • Explain how chocolate is grown and processed.
  • Follow a recipe.
  • Discuss why chocolate was so important to the Maya.

You Will Need

  • Web-enabled devices
  • Cacao nibs
  • Oven
  • Pestles and mortars
  • Mixing bowls
  • Drinking cups
  • Molinillos (or whisks)
  • Chilli powder
  • Cinnamon sticks
  • Honey

Session 4 Model making

Objectives

History

  • Undertake an in-depth study of a non-European society that provides contrasts with British history- The Maya civilization.
  • Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.

Geography

  • Present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

Teaching and Activities

Use their sketches to make models of how the different regions of the Maya lands handled farming. Label the model using their geographical knowledge.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To create a model of Maya farming.
  • To create a model of Maya land use and ecology.

Children will:

  • Present their knowledge of Maya farming and hunting in a model.
  • Present their knowledge of Maya land use and ecology in a model.
  • Explain the Maya's different methods of hunting and farming in different environments.

You Will Need

  • Cardboard
  • Newspaper
  • Modroc
  • Paint
  • Card
  • Pens
  • Bowls of water

Weblinks

There are no weblinks needed for this session.