Find out when Maya civilisation was first recognised by archaeologists and when this society is said to have come to an end, recognising that there are still living Maya people today. Examine different types of evidence that tell us about the Maya. Explore the region of the Maya civilization in Mesoamerica and create a Maya corner in the classroom.

Session 1 When do we know the Maya lived?

Objectives

History

  • Develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study.
  • Undertake an in-depth study of a non-European society that provides contrasts with British history - The Maya civilization.

English

  • Participate in discussions, presentations, performances, role-play, improvisations and debates.

Planning and Activities

Work in teams to remember and add dates of events in Europe to a timeline of the Maya.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To establish a chronological context of the Maya.
  • To discuss the dates already known in British history.

Children will:

  • Explain the main periods of the Maya civilization.
  • Explain how the Maya civilization ended but Maya people still live in Mesoamerica.
  • Discuss their prior knowledge of British history.

Provided Resources

  • The Ancient Maya
  • The Maya timeline
  • The British timeline
  • The Modern Maya

You Will Need

You do not need any particular resources for this session.

Session 2 How do we know about the Maya?

Objectives

History

  • Understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.
  • Undertake an in-depth study of a non-European society that provides contrasts with British history- The Maya civilization.

English

  • Participate in discussions, presentations, performances, role-play, improvisations and debates.

Planning and Activities

Assess the reliability of various sources of evidence for the Maya, including archaeology, images, writing and oral history.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To explore different sources of evidence about the Maya.
  • To discuss what we can find out from different sources of evidence.

Children will:

  • Work out what historical evidence tells us about the Maya.
  • Assess the usefulness of different sources of evidence.
  • Take part in a discussion.

You Will Need

You do not need any particular resources for this session.

Weblinks

There are no weblinks needed for this session.

Session 3 Where did the Maya live?

Objectives

History

  • Undertake an in-depth study of a non-European society that provides contrasts with British history- The Maya civilization.

Geography

  • Locate the world’s countries using maps, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities.
  • Use maps, and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied.

Art

  • Create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas.

Planning and Activities

Explore maps and websites to find out where the Maya lived and what the different environmental zones are like, make sketches.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To find out where the Maya lived.
  • To explore Mesoamerica's physical and human geography.
  • To make sketches of places in the Maya region.

Children will:

  • Use atlases and online mapping to explore a region.
  • Identify physical and human geographical features of a region.
  • Make sketches in sketchbooks.

You Will Need

  • Maps and atlases

Session 4 Make a Maya map in 3D

Objectives

History

  • Undertake an in-depth study of a non-European society that provides contrasts with British history- The Maya civilization.

Geography

  • Describe and understand key aspects of physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains.
  • Present human and physical features using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

Art

  • Improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials (for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay).

Planning and Activities

Recreate the Maya environmental zones from coast to highlands and lowlands in the classroom, including plants and animals.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To understand the geography of the Maya lands.
  • To demonstrate their understanding of the geography by recreating a miniature Maya region.
  • To make 3D sculptures of plants and animals to go in the Maya corner.

Children will:

  • Demonstrate their knowledge of the physical geography of a region.
  • Make sculptures based on sketches in their sketchbooks.
  • Discuss what life was like living in the different environmental zones of the Maya lands.

You Will Need

  • Large sheets of green and blue paper
  • Egg boxes
  • Modroc™
  • PVA glue
  • Paint
  • FiMo™/Play-doh™