Understand the effect of the first railways on coastal communities and learn about the great changes that happened during the Victorian Age that transformed British leisure time.

Session 1 The seaside holiday - when did it all begin?

Objectives

History

  • To study an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066, for example; a significant turning point in British history such as the first railways.
  • To address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference and significance.
  • To construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.
  • To understand that our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.

Geography

  • Describe and understand key aspects of human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.

Teaching and Activities

Discover how the Victorian era was a time of great change and in particular how the coming of railways impacted on coastal towns.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To begin to understand what a Victorian beach holiday was like.
  • To begin to understand that the building of railways and the idea of leisure time had an impact on coastal towns.

Children will:

  • Begin to understand that the Victorian era was a time of great change for the people of Britain.
  • Use photos and paintings to get a better understanding of how Victorians spent their leisure time.
  • Consider how and why our holidays are similar and different to the Victorian holidays.
  • Begin to consider that the introduction of railways had an impact on coastal towns.

You Will Need

  • Copies of Victorian beach pictures for each group

Session 2 It's quicker by rail!

Objectives

Art

  • To know how art and design reflect and shape our history, and contribute to the culture, creativity and wealth of our nation.

English

  • To write for a range of real purposes and audiences as part of their work across the curriculum.

History

  • To study an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066, for example; a significant turning point in British history such as the first railways.
  • To understand that our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.

Teaching and Activities

Look at famous rail adverts encouraging holidays by the sea and begin to plan your own rail poster.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To look at historical British railway art and begin to consider why they were so popular.
  • To understand the persuasive writing techniques used in the advertising posters in preparation for creating their own.
  • To look at historical railway posters and consider how they reflect a different era and begin to consider how they show changes in our society.

Children will:

  • Look at the famous adverts created by various rail networks encouraging people to visit coastal towns for their holidays.
  • Consider why beach holidays are still as popular today.
  • Consider what persuasive techniques were used in the posters – briefly discussing the term ‘propaganda’
  • Discuss why they think the posters are still popular today.
  • Begin to consider ideas to persuade people to travel by rail to visit Blackpool.

You Will Need

  • Access to ‘visit Blackpool’ website

Session 3 Creating persuasive railway posters

Objectives

Art

  • To know how art and design reflect and shape our history, and contribute to the culture, creativity and wealth of our nation.
  • To improve their mastery of art and design techniques including painting.

English

  • To write for a range of real purposes and audiences as part of their work across the curriculum.

Teaching and Activities

Plan and paint an attractive rail poster to entice people to travel to Blackpool.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To use paints to create a new railway poster based on the famous ones from history.
  • To use persuasive techniques, which could include propaganda, in an advertising poster.

Children will:

  • Plan a rail poster to persuade people to travel by rail to Blackpool.
  • From their plan, create their own railway posters based on the style of the historical ‘it’s quicker by rail’ adverts used to entice people on a coastal holiday.
  • Consider what makes a poster effective as an advert.
  • Carefully paint the poster.

You Will Need

  • Individual whiteboards
  • A4 paper
  • A3 art paper
  • Paints
  • Rulers

Session 4 Collecting data

Objectives

History

  • To study an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066, for example; a significant turning point in British history such as the first railways.
  • To address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference and significance.
  • To construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.
  • To understand that our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.

Geography

  • Describe and understand key aspects of human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.
  • To use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

Teaching and Activities

Use census information to find out about the lives of people in the growing coastal town, Blackpool in 1901.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To use an original resource (1901 census) to construct ideas about the impact of the railway on the town of Blackpool.
  • To collect data about the town of Blackpool and consider what it tells us about the type if settlement it had become.

Children will:

  • Understand how we know about the past.
  • Use a genuine source of information to find out about an area in Blackpool in 1901.
  • Use census information to answer questions about people and their lives.
  • Begin to consider the impact of tourism on a coastal town.

You Will Need

You do not need any particular resources for this session.

Session 5 Was it all so positive? - A debate

Objectives

PSHE

  • To begin to equip pupils with the skills and knowledge to explore political and social issues critically, to weigh evidence, debate and make reasoned arguments (KS3 Citizenship).

Geography

  • To understand the processes that give rise to key physical and human geographical features of the world, how these are interdependent and how they bring about spatial variation and change over time.
  • Describe and understand key aspects of human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.

Teaching and Activities

Debate the impact of tourism on coastal towns. Is it all positive?

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To prepare an argument about the proposed new development of a coastal village from the viewpoint of another.
  • To understand how and why our coastal settlements have or have not changed over time.

Children will:

  • Use their data to draw conclusions about the impact of tourism on coastal towns.
  • Consider the impact of the rail network and other developments on small coastal towns.
  • Discuss possible positive, negative and long-term effects of tourism on coastal towns.
  • Stage a debate about allowing the potential development of a coastal town.

Provided Resources

  • Task sheet, which includes fictional characters for the debate

You Will Need

  • Room or Hall in which to hold a debate

Weblinks

There are no weblinks needed for this session.