Stone Age to Iron Age Britain
Religion and Ritual

Research the development of religion in prehistory. Design and build a replica Stonehenge from cheese puffs or biscuits. Make replica objects to use as props. Re-enact possible scenes from prehistoric religious ceremonies and make a video/audio lecture about the development of religion in prehistory.

Session 1 Introduction to Stone Age to Iron Age religion and ritual

Objectives

History

  • Address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.
  • Understand how our knowledge of the (prehistoric) past is constructed from a range of sources (including archaeological excavation, and the reliability of such sources).

Teaching and Activities

Learn about religious beliefs in prehistory and why a totem pole has appeared in the classroom/field.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To explore the sources of evidence for prehistoric religion.

Children will:

  • Use reasoning to give opinions about a historical object.
  • Make comparisons between objects across cultures.
  • Identify sources of evidence for the past.

You Will Need

  • Cardboard
  • Black pens
  • Brush handle
  • Garden umbrella stand

Session 2 Hunter-gatherer beliefs

Objectives

History

  • Develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British history.
  • Address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.
  • Understand how our knowledge of the (prehistoric) past is constructed from a range of sources (including archaeological excavation, and the reliability of such sources).

Art

  • Improve mastery of art and design techniques.
  • Produce creative work, exploring their ideas and recording their experiences.

English

  • Become more familiar with and confident in using language in a greater variety of situations, for a variety of audiences and purposes, including through drama, formal presentations and debate.

Teaching and Activities

Explore the evidence that suggest some people in the Palaeolithic and Mesolithic probably pretended or believed that they could turn into animals and back again. Make props and improvise a scene.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To find out about the religious beliefs of Palaeolithic and Mesolithic hunter-gatherers.
  • To make wearable art.
  • To improvise a hunter-gatherer religious ceremony.

Children will:

  • Interpret evidence of hunter-gatherer beliefs.
  • Make wearable art inspired by prehistoric images.
  • Take part in an improvised scene of a hunter-gatherer ceremony.

You Will Need

  • Card
  • Scraps of cloth
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • String

Session 3 Neolithic religion and Stonehenge

Objectives

History

  • Develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British history.
  • Address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.

D&T

  • Use research and develop design criteria to inform design.
  • Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas.
  • Select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks.
  • Select from and use a wider range of materials and components.

Teaching and Activities

Learn about how Stonehenge developed over 1500 years and how and why it was built. Find out whether there are any other monuments like Stonehenge from the Neolithic. Devise and make a replica Stonehenge from biscuits.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To find out about Stonehenge and the background of Neolithic religion.
  • To find out about Stonehenge and the background of Neolithic religion.

Children will:

  • Put dates of the Stonehenge landscape in chronological order.
  • Make a reconstruction of Stonehenge using biscuits or cheese puffs.
  • Use their knowledge to discuss the purpose of Stonehenge.

You Will Need

  • Cheese puffs
  • Range of rectangular biscuits
  • Air-drying clay
  • Lego™ figures
  • Torches.

Session 4 Sun and water

Objectives

History

  • Develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British history.
  • Address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference and significance

Art

  • Improve mastery of art and design technique.
  • Produce creative work, exploring their ideas and recording their experiences.

English

  • Become more familiar with and confident in using language in a greater variety of situations, for a variety of audiences and purposes, including through drama, formal presentations and debate.

Teaching and Activities

Find out how religion changed over the course of the Bronze Age, from sun to water worship, and how we know. Make replica decoration or tools and re-enact a possible scene from the Bronze Age.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To find out about how beliefs changed in the Bronze Age.
  • To make Bronze Age jewellery.
  • Take part in a role-play of a Bronze Age religious ceremony.

Children will:

  • Have opinions, based on evidence, about Bronze Age religious belief.
  • Make art objects inspired by Bronze Age objects.
  • Take part in a role-play about Bronze Age religious beliefs.

You Will Need

  • Pears soap
  • Gold metallic card
  • Gold foil
  • Archer, Journey to Stonehenge by Jane Brayne

Session 5 Druids

Objectives

History

  • Develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British history.
  • Address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.
  • Understand how our knowledge of the (prehistoric) past is constructed from a range of sources (including archaeological excavation, and the reliability of such sources).

Art

  • Improve mastery of art and design techniques.
  • Produce creative work, exploring their ideas and recording their experiences.

English

  • Become more familiar with and confident in using language in a greater variety of situations, for a variety of audiences and purposes, including through drama, formal presentations and debate.

Teaching and Activities

Research whether the druids were real, and, if so, what they did. Debate the results of research and then re-enact a possible druidic ritual.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To explore evidence for Iron Age druids.
  • To make Iron Age druidic objects.
  • Take part in a role-play of an Iron Age religious ceremony.

Children will:

  • Have opinions, based on evidence, about Iron Age religious belief.
  • Make art inspired by Iron Age objects.
  • Take part in a role-play about Iron Age religious beliefs.

You Will Need

  • Gold card
  • Florist's wire
  • Green paper
  • Cardboard
  • Alice bands
  • FiMo™ or air-drying clay

Session 6 Lecture

Objectives

History

  • Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.

Computing

  • Select and use software on a range of digital devices.
  • Become responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology.

English:

  • Become more familiar with and confident in using language in a greater variety of situations, for a variety of audiences and purposes, including through drama, formal presentations and debate.

Teaching and Activities

Make a video or audio lecture or discussion about the development of religion in prehistory, with some re-enactments to help viewers understand.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To recall and organise their knowledge of religion in prehistory.
  • To make a video/audio show about prehistoric religion.
  • Take part in a role-play of prehistoric religious ceremonies.

Children will:

  • Present what they know about prehistoric religion.
  • Take part in a role-play.
  • Record video or audio files.
  • Edit video or audio files into a film or radio show.

You Will Need

  • Video and/or audio recording device
  • Editing software

Weblinks

There are no weblinks needed for this session.