Stone Age to Iron Age Britain
Food

Learn about the amazing development of food and cooking from the Stone Age to the Iron Age. Learn about the course of events that might have led Stone-Age people to move from hunting and gathering to farming. Demonstrate your knowledge through performance, a feast and an informative display.

Session 1 Introduction to food

Objectives

History

  • Develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British history establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study.
  • Understand how our knowledge of the (prehistoric) past is constructed from a range of sources (including archaeological excavation, and the reliability of such sources).
  • Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.

English

  • Give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives: Retrieve and record information from non-fiction.
  • Draft and write non-narrative material using simple organisational devices.

Teaching and Activities

Find out how we know about food in Stone Age to Iron Age Britain, by looking at animal bones found on site to the last meal of Lindow Man.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To understand the sources of evidence for prehistoric food.
  • To summarise research findings.

Children will:

  • Look through sources for evidence of prehistoric food.
  • Report back the type of evidence they have and what it shows.
  • Show an understanding of what kind of evidence exists for prehistory.

You Will Need

  • Wooden and/or pottery bowls
  • Wooden spoon
  • Old-fashioned looking butter knife
  • Flatbreads, cottage cheese, honey, blackberries, little apples
  • Paper plates
  • Blu tack

Session 2 Hunting and gathering

Objectives

History

  • Develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British history establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study.
  • Address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.

D&T

  • Understand and apply the principles of a healthy and varied diet.
  • Prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques.
  • Understand seasonality, and know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed.

Teaching and Activities

Find out what kinds of animals hunters killed in the Palaeolithic and Mesolithic, what plants they gathered, and make a prehistoric stew.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To find out about earlier Stone Age food production and cooking.
  • To cook a stew similar to what might have been eaten in the earlier Stone Age.

Children will:

  • Use background knowledge to make deductions about Stone Age flora and fauna.
  • Follow a recipe.
  • Use background knowledge to make deductions about Stone Age cooking.

You Will Need

  • Kitchen and cooking utensils
  • Meat (venison would be best, or lamb)
  • Small new potatoes
  • Mushrooms, Spinach or cabbage, water

Session 3 Farming appears

Objectives

History

  • Develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British history establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study.
  • Address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.

Design and Technology

  • Understand and apply the principles of a healthy and varied diet.
  • Prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques.
  • Understand seasonality, and know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed.

Teaching and Activities

Learn about the coming of farming in the Neolithic and what early farming was like. Make butter from cream and make bread.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To find out about Neolithic farming.
  • To make bread and butter.

Children will:

  • Identify and compare wild and domesticated animals and plants.
  • Make bread and butter.
  • Assess the Neolithic diet and see whether it was healthy.

You Will Need

  • Oven
  • Flour (spelt would be good)
  • Water
  • Extra thick cream
  • Empty clean jam jars
  • Marbles

Session 4 Bronze Age beans

Objectives

History

  • Develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British history establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study.
  • Address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.

Design and Technology

  • Understand and apply the principles of a healthy and varied diet.
  • Prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques.
  • Understand seasonality, and know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed.

Teaching and Activities

Learn about the Bronze Age and how many more crops were introduced at this time. Make oatcakes and a bean stew.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To find out about new crops introduced in the Bronze Age.
  • To make sweet beancakes.

Children will:

  • Identify the name of Bronze Age crops.
  • Make beancakes.
  • Find out the health benefits of eating beans and peas.

You Will Need

  • Several tins of broad beans
  • Food processor
  • Butter
  • Flour
  • Honey.

Session 5 Iron Age feast

Objectives

History

  • Develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British history establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study.
  • Address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.

Design and Technology

  • Understand and apply the principles of a healthy and varied diet.
  • Prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques.
  • Understand seasonality, and know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed.

Teaching and Activities

Learn about Iron Age feasting and create lots of food for a feast based on knowledge of prehistoric food.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To find out about Iron Age feasting.
  • To make food for a feast.

Children will:

  • Identify the name of Iron Age vegetables.
  • Make a recipe they have made before and improve on it.
  • Take part in a re-creation of an Iron Age feast.

You Will Need

  • Flour
  • Broad beans
  • Honey
  • Cream, Butter, Lard
  • Root vegetables
  • Meat (optional)
  • Olives