Stone Age to Iron Age Britain
Homes and Everyday Life

Learn about the development of homes and settlements from the Stone Age to the Iron Age. Investigate life as a villager in those times. Research daily tasks, recreate houses, weave with wool, and share learning with others using whole-class role-play.

Session 1 Introduction to homes and everyday life

Objectives

History

  • Address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.
  • Understand how our knowledge of the (prehistoric) past is constructed from a range of sources (including archaeological excavation, and the reliability of such sources).

Design and Technology

  • Select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks.
  • Select from and use a wider range of materials and components.

Teaching and Activities

Find materials for a replica home in the class/on the field and reconstruct it. Discover what evidence archaeologists use to reconstruct buildings or settlements.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To understand how we know about prehistoric homes.
  • To finish off a reconstructed prehistoric style house.

Children will:

  • Use materials available to prehistoric people to build a shelter.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the principles of archaeological survival.
  • Learn how we know about prehistoric houses from archaeological excavation.

You Will Need

  • Clay
  • Straw bales
  • 2 hazel or willow hurdles
  • Sheepskins or rugs
  • Stones
  • Replica prehistoric objects made of wood, stone, bone, leather, metal.

Session 2 Hunter-gatherer homes

Objectives

History

  • Develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British history.
  • Address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.
  • Understand how our knowledge of the (prehistoric) past is constructed from a range of sources (including archaeological excavation, and the reliability of such sources).

Design and Technology

  • Use research and develop design criteria to inform design.
  • Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas.
  • Select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks.
  • Select from and use a wider range of materials and components.

Teaching and Activities

Investigate reconstructed hunter-gatherer homes. Design and make a model hunter-gatherer home and learn how to make cordage.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To learn about what Palaeolithic and Mesolithic houses looked like.
  • To build a model of a Mesolithic house

Children will:

  • Understand how reconstructions are based on evidence.
  • Create a design sketch of a model house.
  • Learn about and make cordage to use on the model prehistoric house.
  • Build a model prehistoric house.

You Will Need

  • Raffia
  • Sticks
  • Crepe paper or cloth or hay
  • Polystyrene blocks

Session 3 Neolithic farmers' homes

Objectives

History

  • Develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British history.
  • Address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.
  • Understand how our knowledge of the (prehistoric) past is constructed from a range of sources (including archaeological excavation, and the reliability of such sources).

Design and Technology

  • Use research and develop design criteria to inform design.
  • Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas.
  • Select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks.
  • Select from and use a wider range of materials and components.

Teaching and Activities

Research what Neolithic homes looked like and design and make a model Neolithic home.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To learn about what Neolithic houses looked like.
  • To build a model of a Neolithic house.

Children will:

  • Understand how reconstructions are based on evidence.
  • Do a design sketch of a model house.
  • Build a model prehistoric house.

You Will Need

  • Air-drying clay or FiMo
  • Sticks
  • Crepe paper
  • Straw
  • Fleece
  • Polystyrene balls

Session 4 Must Farm

Objectives

History

  • Develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British history.
  • Address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.
  • Understand how our knowledge of the (prehistoric) past is constructed from a range of sources (including archaeological excavation, and the reliability of such sources).

Art

  • Improve mastery of art and design techniques.
  • Produce creative work, exploring their ideas and recording their experiences.

English

  • Use spoken language to develop understanding through speculating, hypothesizing, imagining and exploring ideas.
  • Participate in discussions, presentations, performances, role-play, improvisations and debates.

Teaching and Activities

Research the Bronze Age settlement at Must Farm and make replica objects from the site to use as props in a 'freeze the scene' photograph. Also learn how to weave.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To learn about what a Bronze Age settlement looked like.
  • To make replica objects for a Bronze Age house.
  • To plan a tableau in groups.

Children will:

  • Create a replica historical object using appropriate materials.
  • Demonstrate understanding of Bronze Age life by making a Bronze Age scene.
  • Work with a group to plan a tableau.

You Will Need

  • Cardboard
  • Clay
  • Linen
  • String
  • Willow rods
  • Metallic card
  • Pears soap
  • Playdough

Session 5 Roundhouses

Objectives

History

  • Develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British history.
  • Address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.
  • Understand how our knowledge of the (prehistoric) past is constructed from a range of sources (including archaeological excavation, and the reliability of such sources).

Design and Technlogy

  • Use research and develop design criteria to inform design.
  • Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas.
  • Select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks.
  • Select from and use a wider range of materials and components.

Teaching and Activities

Research Iron Age roundhouses in order to design and make model roundhouses. Learn about and how to do wattling.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To learn about Bronze and Iron Age roundhouses.
  • To make a model Iron Age roundhouse.

Children will:

  • Learn how roundhouses were made.
  • Do some wattling, one of the basic techniques of house building in prehistory.
  • Use their knowledge to design and build a model roundhouse.

You Will Need

  • Polystyrene blocks
  • Sticks
  • Willow wreath
  • Clay
  • Straw
  • Willow or hazel rods

Session 6 Prehistoric role-play

Objectives

History

  • Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.

English

  • Participate in discussions, presentations, performances, role-play, improvisations and debates.
  • Use spoken language to develop understanding through speculating, hypothesizing, imagining and exploring ideas.

Teaching and Activities

Take part in a whole-class role-play of a village in prehistory.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To demonstrate what they have learned about prehistoric houses.
  • To role-play what life was like in a prehistoric settlement.

Children will:

  • Demonstrate their knowledge of prehistoric houses.
  • Take part in a role-play about prehistoric life.

Provided Resources

This session does not need any provided resources.

You Will Need

  • Costumes
  • Bread, honey, butter, cheese, ham, apples

Weblinks

There are no weblinks needed for this session.