Football's popularity is testament to the excitement of the game. Learn about its controversial history in medieval times. Find out about some of the ancient ball games that were precursors to football. Work in teams to devise your own version of football, assess the risks, and then try them out with the whole class. Decide which one was most fun, and whether any changes are needed to make them work better.

Session 1 The first football match

Objectives

History

  • Children should regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.
  • Children should construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.

Teaching and Activities

Many countries claim to have invented football. Research the different ball games from the ancient past and decide which one you think is the most like modern football.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To research historical ball games.

Children will:

  • Address questions about historical sources.
  • Compare and contrast the information in non-fiction sources.
  • Trace the links between modern and historical events.

You Will Need

  • Football or similar

Session 2 Historical football rules

Objectives

History

  • Pupils should continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study.

PE

  • Play competitive games, modified where appropriate, (e.g. badminton, basketball, cricket, football, hockey, netball, rounders and tennis), and apply basic principles suitable for attacking and defending.

Teaching and Activities

The rules of football were different when they were first formulated in 1863. Compare the original rules to the modern ones, and practice playing both sets.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To compare early football rules to modern ones.
  • To play football with different rules.

Children will:

  • Compare and contrast two documents, highlighting similarities and differences
  • Play as part of a competitive game
  • Give reasons why certain rules are in place for a sport

You Will Need

  • Highlighting pens
  • Footballs
  • Space to play

Session 3 Football design

Objectives

History

  • Continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study.

Design and Technology

  • Investigate and analyse a range of existing products.
  • Understand how key events and individuals in design and technology have helped shape the world.

Science

  • Use test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests.
  • Report and present findings from enquiries including: conclusions, causal relationships and explanations of and degree of trust in results.

Teaching and Activities

Investigate what footballs have been made of over the years, and what the standards for footballs are now. Test the school footballs against the FA's requirements.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • Investigate football design over the centuries.
  • Test footballs.

Children will:

  • Put sources in chronological order.
  • Describe how a designed object has developed over a long period.
  • Test a designed object.

You Will Need

  • School footballs
  • Football pumps with pressure gauges

Session 4 Football skills

Objectives

PE

  • Play competitive games, modified where appropriate, (e.g. badminton, basketball, cricket, football, hockey, netball, rounders and tennis), and apply basic principles suitable for attacking and defending.

PSHE

  • Reflect on and celebrate their achievements, identify their strengths, areas for improvement, set high aspirations and goals.
  • Learn about taking care of their body.

Science

  • Recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way their bodies function.

Teaching and Activities

Discuss what skills footballers need to play the game effectively. Try out some footballers training drills. Measure how they affect the body. Work out some training exercises they could do to improve their game.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To devise and undertake some training exercises.
  • To measure how training exercises affect their body.

Children will:

  • Explain the effects of exercise.
  • Explain why sports people warm up before playing.
  • Complete warm-up exercises.

You Will Need

  • Stopwatches
  • Hoops
  • Cones.

Session 5 A new game of football

Objectives

PE

  • Play competitive games, modified where appropriate, (e.g. badminton, basketball, cricket, football, hockey, netball, rounders and tennis), and apply basic principles suitable for attacking and defending.

PSHE

  • Deepen their understanding of risk by recognising, predicting and assessing risks in different situations and deciding how to manage them responsibly, (including sensible road use and risks in their local environment), and to use this as an opportunity to build resilience.

Teaching and Activities

Football has changed a lot over the years. Work in teams to devise your own version of football, assess the risks, and then try them out with the whole class. Decide which one was most fun, and whether any changes are needed to make them work better.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To devise a modified game of football and play it.
  • To assess the risks of the rules of their football game.

Children will:

  • Predict the risks of a competitive game.
  • Agree the rules of a competitive game.
  • Play a competitive game.

You Will Need

  • Footballs
  • Space to play.

Weblinks

There are no weblinks needed for this session.