Learn about the history of cricket: where it got its name, where was it invented and how has it changed over the centuries. From its origins as a children's game, it gained popularity as a game for adults and eventually the game spread from England to places that Britain took over as part of the British Empire, which was the basis for several controversies.

Session 1 When and where?

Objectives

History

  • Address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.
  • Understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.
  • Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.

PE

  • Play competitive games, modified where appropriate, (e.g. badminton, basketball, cricket, football, hockey, netball, rounders and tennis), and apply basic principles suitable for attacking and defending.

PSHE

  • Deepen their understanding of risk by recognising, predicting and assessing risks in different situations and deciding how to manage them responsibly.

Teaching and Activities

Research the history of cricket, including protective equipment, from historical drawings and sources. Discuss where you think cricket was invented. Play French cricket.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To find out about the history of cricket.
  • To play French cricket.
  • To decide on measures to lessen the risk of getting hurt while playing French cricket.

Children will:

  • Make interpretations based on historical evidence.
  • Assess risk.
  • Play French cricket.

You Will Need

  • Cricket bats or tennis racquets and balls

Session 2 The Empire Years

Objectives

History

  • Regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.
  • Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information
  • Study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066.

Geography

  • Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied.

PSHE

  • Understand that differences and similarities between people arise from a number of factors, including family, cultural, ethnic, racial and religious diversity, age, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, and disability.
  • Realise the nature and consequences of discrimination, teasing, bullying and aggressive behaviours.

English

  • LKS2: Discussing writing similar to that which they are planning to write in order to understand and learn from its structure, vocabulary and grammar.
  • UKS2: Identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own.

Teaching and Activities

Explore the ramifications of the British Empire in terms of its effects on cricket and annotate a map with this historical information. Learn about the rivalry between India and Pakistan after Partition, and how South Africa was banned from competing over apartheid. Write speeches about the potential for sport to bring people together or increase competitiveness.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To find out about how cricket became a global sport.
  • To find out about some of the countries that play cricket.
  • To explore how political and social tensions can influence sport.
  • To write a speech about how sport can bring people together.

Children will:

  • Explain how the British Empire spread cricket.
  • Discuss how sport has sometimes been used in political disputes.
  • Write a speech about promoting sporting values.

Provided Resources

  • Map of the British Empire 1922
  • Cricket controversies
  • Speeches about how sport can bring people together
  • Writing a speech about the positive power of cricket

You Will Need

You do not need any particular resources for this session.

Session 3 Howzat

Objectives

PE

  • Play competitive games, modified where appropriate, (for example, badminton, basketball, cricket, football, hockey, netball, rounders and tennis), and apply basic principles suitable for attacking and defending.

Maths

  • Yr 3: Present data using bar charts, pictograms and tables.
  • Yr 4: Present discrete and continuous data using appropriate graphical methods, including bar charts and time graphs.
  • Yr 5: Solve comparison, sum and difference problems using information presented in a line graph.
  • Yr 6: Interpret and construct pie charts and line graphs and use these to solve problems; calculate and interpret the mean as an average.

Teaching and Activities

Make and play a cricket dice game to explore how maths is used in cricket to either present information using an appropriate graphical method or in working out batting and bowling averages to rank players and teams.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To play Howzat, a dice game based on cricket.
  • To make a 3D shape from a net, work out averages (Y6 only) and make a bar chart.

Children will:

  • Make a 3D shape from a 2D net.
  • Contribute to a bar chart.

Older children will:

  • Work out the mean as an average.
  • Interpret the results on a bar chart.

You Will Need

  • Card
  • Glue
  • Scissors

Session 4 Play the game

Objectives

PE

  • Play competitive games, modified where appropriate, (for example, badminton, basketball, cricket, football, hockey, netball, rounders and tennis), and apply basic principles suitable for attacking and defending.

Maths

  • Yr 3: Present data using bar charts, pictograms and tables.
  • Yr 4: Present discrete and continuous data using appropriate graphical methods, including bar charts and time graphs.
  • Yr 5: Solve comparison, sum and difference problems using information presented in a line graph.
  • Yr 6: Interpret and construct pie charts and line graphs and use these to solve problems; calculate and interpret the mean as an average.

Teaching and Activities

Play a game of cricket, modifying the rules as appropriate and given what children already know about managing the risk of playing this game. Keep track of batting scores to work out batting averages.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To play a game of cricket.
  • To work out batting averages and make a bar chart of them.

Children will:

  • Take part in a game of cricket.
  • Keep score of team and individual runs.
  • Work out their own batting average and contribute to a class bar chart.

You Will Need

  • Bat
  • Wicket
  • Ball
  • Protective equipment