Ancient Greece
Olympics

Learn about the significance of the Ancient Greek Olympics. Research the details and structure of the ancient Olympics and recreate parts of them.

Session 1 Going to the games

Objectives

History

  • Continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of Britain, local and world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study.
  • Gain and deploy a historically-grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘civilization’.
  • Understand Ancient Greece, Greek life, their achievements and influence on the western world.

Teaching and Activities

Research what Ancient Games was like, the opening ceremony, who visited and what they did; experience an Olympic opening ceremony with singing and feasting.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To research what the event was like and who visited and gain an understanding of its importance and grandeur.

Children will:

  • Research what the Ancient Games were like, who visited and what they did.
  • Research the format and meaning of the Ancient Greek opening ceremony.

Provided Resources

  • Ancient Greek pottery
  • Facts about the Ancient Greek Olympic Games

You Will Need

  • Food: olives, figs, other dried fruit, honey, olive oil, cubed feta cheese
  • Dipping bowls
  • Cocktail sticks
  • Large strips of sugar/display/wallpaper cut into the shape of large pillars
  • Smaller sheets of sugar paper cut into rectangles (like stone blocks)

Session 2 The first olympic games

Objectives

History

  • Continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of Britain, local and world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study.
  • Gain and deploy a historically-grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘civilization’.
  • Understand Ancient Greece, Greek life, their achievements and influence on the western world.

Design and Technology

  • Use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products which are fit for purpose.

Teaching and Activities

Research the Olympic flame, its origins in Olympia and journey to the host’s stadium; consider the importance the god Zeus played in the Games and why olive leaf wreaths were given to the winners; make Olympic torches and olive leaf wreaths.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To research the Olympic flame, its origins in Olympia and journey to the host’s stadium.
  • To research the importance the god Zeus played in the Games and why olive leaf wreaths were given to the winners.
  • To make Olympic torches and olive leaf wreathes for the class Olympic Games.

Children will:

  • Research the Olympic flame, its origins in Olympia and journey to the host’s stadium.
  • Consider the importance the god Zeus played in the Games and why olive leaf wreaths were given to the winners.
  • Recreate the Olympic flame.

Provided Resources

  • How to make an Olympic Torch
  • How to make an Olive Leaf wreath

You Will Need

  • Cocoa butter/fragranced hand cream
  • Large cones or roll of card
  • Tissue paper
  • Sequin sheets
  • Glue and tape
  • Green paper

Session 3 Event and spectators

Objectives

History

  • Continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of Britain, local and world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study.
  • Gain and deploy a historically-grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘civilization’.
  • Understand Ancient Greece, Greek life, their achievements and influence on the western world.

Teaching and Activities

Research the events at the original Olympic Games and compare to modern day Olympic Games; imagine what it would have been like for the spectators of the Ancient Greek Games and research famous athletes.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To research the events at the original Olympic Games and compare to modern day Olympic Games.

Children will:

  • Research the events at the original Olympic Games and compare to modern day Olympic Games.
  • Imagine what it would have been like for the spectators of the Ancient Greek Games and research famous athletes.

You Will Need

  • Large sheets of paper (wallpaper)
  • Marker pens

Session 4 Class closing feast

Objectives

History

  • Continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of Britain, local and world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study.
  • Gain and deploy a historically-grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘civilization’.
  • Understand Ancient Greece, Greek life, their achievements and influence on the western world.

English

  • Develop wider skills in spoken language.
  • Confidence, enjoyment and mastery of language should be extended through public speaking, performance and debate.

Teaching and Activities

Research how the Ancient Greeks celebrated the end of the Games; host a class Olympic Games’ closing feast; prepare and deliver 2 minute long performances, such as speeches, juggling and wise philosophical words to the spectators at the Games’ feast.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To research how the Ancient Greeks celebrated the end of the Games and host a class closing feast and invite guests.
  • To prepare and deliver 2 minute long performances, such as speeches, juggling and wise philosophical words to the guests at the Games’ feast.

Children will:

  • Research how the Ancient Greeks celebrated the end of the Games.
  • Host an Olympic Games’ closing feast.
  • Prepare and deliver 2 minute long performances, such as speeches, juggling and wise philosophical words to the spectators at the Games’ feast.

Provided Resources

This session does not need any provided resources.

You Will Need

  • Classical music
  • Chosen food for closing feast
  • Cocktail sticks
  • Olive leaf wreaths and Olympic flames from previous session