Maths Year 1 Summer Measures, Shape, Data

Each unit has everything you need to teach a set of related skills and concepts. 'Teaching for Understanding' provides whole-class teaching and fully differentiated adult-led group activities. ‘Problem-solving and Reasoning’ develops these skills, and includes questions to enable you to assess mastery. Practice sheets ensure procedural fluency. Extra support activities enable targeted work with children who are well below ARE.

‘UNIT PLAN’ gives you a text version of all parts of the unit to use in your school planning documentation. ‘DOWNLOAD ALL FILES’ gives you that unit plan plus all of associated documents. These bulk downloads are available to friends and School Subscribers. These bulk downloads are added value for Hamilton Friends and School Subscribers.

Unit 1 Compare and measure capacities (suggested as 3 days)

Objectives

Explore container capacities
Unit 1: ID# 1949

National Curriculum
Meas (i-c) and (ii-c)

Hamilton Objectives
17. Compare objects according to capacity, using appropriate mathematical language.
18. Count uniform non-standard, then simple standard units to measure capacity.

Teaching and Group Activities for Understanding

Day 1 Teaching
Show two containers with different capacities and of different proportions. Fill the larger with coloured water. Pour into the smaller. Then vice versa. Which has larger capacity? Rehearse vocabulary ‘full’, ‘half full’, ‘nearly full’, ’empty’, ‘nearly empty’.
Group Activities
-- Match labels to pictures of containers.
-- Compare and order containers by capacity.

Day 2 Teaching
Show children a container and a plastic cup. Ask children how many cups will fill the container. Less than 5? More than 5? More than 10? Take suggestions, then measure. Place four containers in order from the least capacity to the greatest capacity.
Group Activities
Use the ‘Fill the Bucket’ in-depth problem-solving investigation below as today’s group activity.
Or, use these activities:
-- Order containers by capacity.
-- Estimate and measure container capacity.

Day 3 Teaching
Show children 4 containers of different proportions, e.g. a wide shallow bowl, a tall thin vase, etc. Ask children which holds more/less, most/least. Discuss. Suggest counting how many cups of sand will fill each container to check the order. Measure and order them.
Group Activities
-- Sort containers into 2 groups by capacity.
-- Estimate how many egg cups of sand a range of containers holds.

You Will Need

  • Various containers, food dye and washing up bowl
  • ‘Empty and full’ sheet (see resources)
  • Water, plastic cup and funnel
  • ‘Comparing capacities’ sheet (see resources)
  • Sand and labels
  • Mini-whiteboards and pens

Mental/Oral Maths Starters

Suggested for Day 1
Say the number that is 1 more (simmering skills)

Suggested for Day 2
Write the number that is 1 more (simmering skills)

Suggested for Day 3
Counting in 10s (simmering skills)

Procedural Fluency

Day 1
Draw levels showing how full up the containers are.

Day 2
Order the containers on the shelf by their capacity. Reason about capacity.

Day 3
Compare container capacities.

Mastery: Reasoning and Problem-Solving

  • How many cups full of sand would it take to fill a tray from the maths equipment cupboard?
    -- Make a good guess
    -- Write it down.
    -- Use cups to measure and check
  • Make a cone out of paper. Estimate how many egg cups of lentils or rice it will hold. Measure to check your estimate.
  • How many cups more does your water bottle hold when it is full, than it does when it is half empty?

In-depth Investigation: Fill the Bucket
Children estimate then measure the capacity of a bucket, and play a game filling it.

Extra Support

Don’t Drink the Water!
Comparing capacity by direct comparison

Unit 2 Explore container capacity (suggested as 2 days)

Objectives

Explore container capacities
Unit 2: ID# 1973

National Curriculum
Meas (i-c) and (ii-c)
Y2 Stats (i) (ii)

Hamilton Objectives
17. Compare objects according to capacity, using appropriate mathematical language.
18. Count uniform non-standard, then simple standard units to measure capacity.
23. Sort items into lists or tables.

Teaching and Group Activities for Understanding

Day 1 Teaching
Show children 4 bowls, all of different sizes. These bowls were left in the 3 bears’ house. Remind children that to find out more about how much they hold, we can measure by filling each with cups of water. Demonstrate how to draw a pictogram to record the capacities measured in numbers of cups.
Group Activities
-- Create a pictogram to show the capacity of the 3 bears’ bowls.

Day 2 Teaching
The Three Bears and Goldilocks have invited Jack and Jill for tea! The only problem is they have lots of different-sized glasses for their homemade lemonade. Measure the capacity of two of the glasses, modelling recording results in a table, then transferring data onto a block graph.
Group Activities
Use the in-depth problem-solving investigation ‘Thirsty?’ from NRICH as today’s group activity.
Or, use this activity:
-- Create a block graph to show the capacity of different glasses.

You Will Need

  • 4 pudding bowls, flipchart, cups and water
  • ‘Pictogram to show the capacity of the three bears’ bowls’ (see resources)
  • Sticky notes, large ruler and pens
  • ‘Block graph’ (see resources)
  • Egg cups, selection of small glasses and water
  • Large squared paper and IWB/flipchart
  • Dice

Procedural Fluency

Day 1
Create a pictogram to show different capacities. Answer questions about the pictogram.

Day 2
Create a block graph to show different bottle capacities. Answer questions about the block graph.

Mastery: Reasoning and Problem-Solving

  • Line up 3 different shaped containers in order of capacity: ‘holds least’ to ‘holds most’. (see illustration on download)
    How will you check to see if you were correct?
  • Estimate the capacity of your shoe! Use an eggcup and lentils or rice to measure it.
  • Look at the Block graph of several children’s shoes. (see illustration on download)
    Whose shoe has the largest capacity?
    Whose has the least?
    Which 2 shoes have the same capacity?

In-depth Investigation: Thirsty?
Using the clues, can the children order the glasses of juice? Thirsty? from nrich.maths.org.

Extra Support

Bottles (1)
Use estimation and measuring to explore which bottle holds the most/least liquid. Bottles (1) from nrich.maths.org.

Unit 3 Recognise/describe 3-D shapes and turns (suggested as 2 days)

Objectives

Recognise/describe 3-D shapes; turns
Unit 3: ID# 1979

National Curriculum:
PofS (i-b)
P&D (i)

Hamilton Objectives
24. Name and describe common 3-D shapes; recognise the difference between 2-D and 3-D shapes.
25. Describe position, direction and movement, including whole, half, quarter and three-quarter turns.

Teaching and Group Activities for Understanding

Day 1 Teaching
Show some examples of different 3-D shapes, tin of beans, cereal packet, etc. Look at what happens to the shape if it is turned through a 1/4 turn, through a 1/2 turn, through a 3/4 turn. Does it matter which direction we turn it?
Group Activities
Use the ‘Spin the Mouse’ in-depth problem-solving investigation below as today’s group activity.
Or, use these activities:
-- Explore 3-D shapes and turn them to different positions.

Day 2 Teaching
Show a cube and demonstrate how we can count the faces by putting a sticker on each face. Count the number of edges by putting a piece of sticky-tack on each. Repeat for a cuboid. Then show a short film to demonstrate the similarities and difference between cubes and cuboids.
Group Activities
-- Describe the position of shapes in relation to other shapes.
-- Recognise a shape by listening to a description of its position.

You Will Need

  • Tin of baked beans, cereal box and 3-D shapes
  • Globe or ball
  • Mini-whiteboards and pens
  • Variety of 3-D objects
  • Coloured stickers, IWB and sticky-tack
  • Coloured 3-D shapes and tray
  • ‘3-D shapes’ (see resources)

Mental/Oral Maths Starters

Day 1
2-D shape (pre-requisite skills)

Day 2
2-D shape (pre-requisite skills)

Procedural Fluency

Day 1
Draw shapes look like after a 1/4 and 1/2 turn.

Day 2
Write descriptions of the position of shapes in relation to other shapes.

Mastery: Reasoning and Problem-Solving

  • Look at the shape pictured (see illustration on download).
    Imagine it turns through half a complete turn. Draw what it looks like now.
  • Find an example of each of these shapes in your classroom and draw it.
    1. Cylinder
    2. Cube
    3. Cone
    4. Sphere
  • What shape is a cereal box? How many edges does it have?

In-depth Investigation: Spin the Mouse
Children turn a mouse through a rolled number of quarter or half turns, aiming to get the mouse facing home again.

Unit 4 Measure time using different units (suggested as 3 days)

Objectives

Measure time using different units
Unit 4: ID# 1987

National Curriculum
Meas
(i-d) (ii-d) (iv) (v) (vi)

Hamilton Objectives
19. Tell the time to the half hour on analogue and digital clocks.
20. Use the language of time including days, months, earlier, later, yesterday, minutes, hours, days, weeks and years.
21. Sequence events in chronological order.

Teaching and Group Activities for Understanding

Day 1 Teaching
Show children month cards January–December. Choose child to find January. Peg to a washing line. Repeat for all 12 months. Point to and say the months together. Group the months into seasons. Discuss whose birthdays are in which month (more of this in a later lesson). Which season is your birthday in?
Group Activities
-- Make a paper chain of months of the year and order them.

Day 2 Teaching
Show a geared clock. Children count the hours as you move the hands round to show each hour. Show a clock with a second hand. Demonstrate minutes and seconds. Time can be measured in hours, minutes and seconds. Time a few short activities to demonstrate measuring in seconds.
Group activities
-- Explore what can be achieved in 1 minute.

Day 3 Teaching
Discuss how we can write o’clock and half past times shown on an analogue clock in digital format. Point out that there are 60 minutes in an hour, so half past is 30 minutes after the hour. Children order half past times from midday to 7 in the evening.
Group Activities
Use the ‘Time Challenge’ in-depth problem-solving investigation below as today’s group activity.
Or, use these activities:
-- Order jumbled TV times and convert to analogue times.
-- Look at digital and analogue times and order them.

You Will Need

  • ‘Months’ cards (see resources)
  • Washing line
  • Strips of coloured paper, glue/staples
  • Pre-prepared strips of paper with months of the year written on
  • Large geared teaching clock
  • ITP: Tell the Time
  • One-minute sand timers and dice
  • Analogue clock and digital clock on IWB
  • Mini-whiteboards and pens
  • ‘TV programmes’ (see resources)
  • ‘Analogue clocks’ (see resources)
  • Small analogue clocks
  • ‘Time cards’ (see resources)

Mental/Oral Maths Starters

Day 1
Count in steps of 1 hour (pre-requisite skills)

Day 2
Days of the week and months of the year (pre-requisite skills)

Suggested for Day 3
Days of the week (simmering skills)

Procedural Fluency

Day 1
Work out the month(s) represented in the picture; answer questions about months of the year.
Mark the children’s lists of months. Are they in the correct order?

Day 2
Suggest the time unit different activities would be measured in. Draw clock hands and order times.

Day 3
Order a mixture of analogue and digital times, noting what you would be doing at those times of the day.

Mastery: Reasoning and Problem-Solving

  • Write these 4 months in the order they come in the year: July – April – December – February
    Write the initial of the season (e.g. W for winter) for each month beside it.
  • What unit of time would be used to measure how long it takes to…?
    (a) Read a picture book
    (b) Jump up and down 3 times
    (c) Wait for your next birthday
    (d) Run the length of the playground
    (e) Become a teenager
  • How many minutes from..?
    (a) 10:30 to 11 o’clock?
    (b) 3 o’clock to half past 3?
    (c) 12:30 to 1 o’clock?

In-depth Investigation: Time Challenge
Children use time vocabulary to write times on analogue clocks.

Extra Support

Time Jigsaws
Telling the time to the hour on analogue clocks

Unit 5 Time data: graphs and pictograms (suggested as 2 days)

Objectives

Time data: graphs and pictograms
Unit 5: ID# 1993

National Curriculum
Meas (v)
Y2 Stats (i) (ii)

Hamilton Objectives
20. Use the language of time including days, months, earlier, later, yesterday, minutes, hours, days, weeks and years.
23. Sort items into lists or tables.

Teaching and Group Activities for Understanding

Day 1 Teaching
Show the months of the year on cards; rehearse saying them in order together. Construct a block graph based on how many children’s birthdays there are in each month. Discuss and complete the first two bars on the graph.
Group Activities
-- Create block graphs to show birthday months in the class.

Day 2 Teaching
Collect some birthday data from another class; show on the IWB. Compare it to your class’ birthday data. Model displaying this information on a pictogram.
Group Activities
Use the in-depth problem-solving investigation ‘Ladybird Count’ from NRICH as today’s group activity.
Or, use this activity:
-- Create a pictogram to show birthday data.

You Will Need

  • ‘Months’ (see resources)
  • Pegs
  • Crib sheet with the birthdays of the children in your class (if needed)
  • ‘Labelled block graph’ (see resources)
  • ‘Blank block graph’ (see resources)
  • Large sheet of paper
  • Stickers
  • Photocopied agreed symbols
  • ‘Pictogram’ sheets (see resources)

Mental/Oral Maths Starters

Suggested for Day 1
What would the time be? (simmering skills)

Suggested for Day 2
Days of the week (simmering skills)

Procedural Fluency

Day 1
Answer questions about the block graph showing favourite school subjects.

Day 2
Answer questions about a pictogram.
Create a pictogram about favourite TV shows; then answer questions.

Mastery: Reasoning and Problem-Solving

  • Work with a friend. Take 3 handfuls of multi-link each. Count how many of each colour. Draw a block graph to show your results.
  • Look at this block graph. (See illustration)
    There were 6 cubes of which colour?
    Which 2 colours had the same number of cubes?
    Which colour had 2 fewer cubes than yellow?

In-depth Investigation: Ladybird Count
Create a graph to show how many ladybirds the children had at the end of the game. Ladybird Count from nrich.maths.org.

Extra Support

Smiley Sums
Draw pictograms; Add by counting on.