Everyday Materials

Science Year 1/2 Brilliant Builders: Comparing Materials

Rise to the challenge of fixing a torn umbrella, explore different materials and answer the questions: how can we know that this material will not let the rain through? How can we test it? Go on further to investigate the absorbency and waterproofing of materials.

Session 1 Fixing a torn umbrella: Part 1

Objectives

Look at a selection of materials and consider which one is best for fixing a broken umbrella. Explain your selection and predict the outcome.

Science Objectives
i) Describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials (1EM).
ii) Compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of their simple physical properties (1EM).
iii) Identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper and cardboard for particular uses (2EM).

Working Scientifically

  1. Ask simple questions and recognise that they can be answered in different ways.
  2. Identify and classify.
  3. Use their observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions.

You Will Need

Provided Resources

  • Different umbrellas and 'Exploring Umbrella Materials' sheet
  • Vocabulary fan sheet
  • Umbrella designs sheets

Additional Resources

  • A torn umbrella
  • Samples of materials including a selection of suitable fabrics (hessian, felt, paper, cotton, plastic, oil skin, carpet etc) and unsuitable materials (metal, wood etc)
  • Cameras or recording devices

Teaching and Activities

Teaching

  • Recap on how different objects are made from different materials (Yr1).
  • Rise to the challenge of fixing a torn umbrella, using materials selected for their properties.
  • Discuss their selection of materials for fixing the umbrella: what properties does this material have that makes it a good choice? (Yr2)

Activities

  1. Consider the most suitable materials for fixing a torn umbrella, according to their properties.
  2. Understand that some properties make a material more suitable than others (Yr2).

Investigation - sorting, classifying and identifying, problem solving
Sort objects in the classroom according to these criteria: flexible, rigid, hard, soft, stretchy, stiff. Use materials selected for their properties to fix a torn umbrella.
Year 1 - Recap on how different objects are made from different materials.
Year 2 - Discuss their selection of materials for fixing the umbrella: what properties does this material have that makes it a good choice?

Vocabulary
Waterproof, absorbent, breaks/tears, materials, properties

Session 2 Fixing a torn umbrella: Part 2

Objectives

Test a selection of materials using a pipette to simulate raindrops and consider why some materials let water through and others do not.

Science Objectives
i) Describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials (1EM).
ii) Compare and group together a variety of everyday materials, based on properties (1EM).
iii) Identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper and cardboard for particular uses (2EM).

Working Scientifically

  1. Ask simple questions and recognise that they can be answered in different ways.
  2. Observe closely, using simple equipment.
  3. Perform simple tests.
  4. Identify and classify.
  5. Use their observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions.
  6. Gather and record data to help answer questions.

You Will Need

Provided Resources

  • Different umbrellas and 'Investigating Umbrella Materials' sheet

Additional Resources

  • A torn umbrella
  • Samples of materials including a selection of suitable fabrics (hessian, felt, paper, cotton, plastic, oil skin, carpet etc) and unsuitable materials (metal, wood etc)
  • Cameras or recording devices
  • Pipettes
  • Jugs or bowls of water
  • Tape

Teaching and Activities

Teaching

  • Investigate materials for their useful properties, considering questions such as: how can we know that this material will not let the rain through? How can we test it? (Yr2)
  • Use pipettes to simulate raindrops and experiment with the different materials (Yr1).
  • Observe and record the results (Yr1).
  • Make hypotheses about why certain materials do not let water through (Yr2).

Activities

  1. Understand, through exploration and investigation, that some materials are more suitable than others for mending an umbrella because of their physical properties.
  2. Understand and articulate their scientific reasoning for selecting and investigating certain materials.

Investigation - observing over time, problem solving
Investigate materials for their useful properties, considering questions e.g. how can we know that this material will not let the rain through? How can we test it? Use pipettes to simulate raindrops and test different materials.
Year 1 - Observe and record the results.
Year 2 - Make hypotheses about why certain materials do not let water through.

Vocabulary
Waterproof, absorbent, breaks/tears, materials, properties

Session 3 Are bricks absorbent?

Objectives

Think about hard materials and their absorbent properties. Which building materials are absorbent? Why are they so? Test different hard materials and record the results.

Science Objectives
i) Describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials (1EM).
ii) Compare and group together a variety of everyday materials, based on properties (1EM).
iii) Identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper and cardboard for particular uses (2EM).
iv) Find out how the shapes of solid objects made from some materials can be changed by squashing, bending, twisting and stretching (2EM).

Working Scientifically

  1. Ask simple questions and recognise that they can be answered in different ways.
  2. Observe closely, using simple equipment.
  3. Perform simple tests.
  4. Identify and classify.
  5. Use their observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions.
  6. Gather and record data to help answer questions.

You Will Need

Provided Resources

  • Hypothesis Thinking Sheet

Additional Resources

  • A variety of hard materials (different type of wood, including balsa wood, brick, plastics, plaster, clay, metals)
  • Shallow bowls of water
  • Timers

Teaching and Activities

Teaching

  • Consider what buildings are made of and why (Yr1).
  • Consider the question: Can 'hard' materials (wood, stone) absorb water?
  • Devise an investigation to test a variety of materials (plastics, metals, different types of wood and bricks) for their absorbent property (Yr2).
  • Make predictions about the absorbency of selected items (Yr2).

Activities

  1. Consider and investigate the hypothesis "Hard materials cannot absorb water" and make predictions about different materials before testing them.
  2. Make decisions about how to record the results of the investigation in a clear way for others to follow.

Investigation - pattern seeking, testing
Consider question: Can 'hard' materials (wood, stone) absorb water?
Year 1 - Consider what buildings are made of and why.
Year 2 - Devise an investigation to test a variety of materials (plastics, metals, different types of wood, bricks) for their absorbent property and make predictions

Vocabulary
Material, properties, absorbency, waterproof, strong

Session 4 Mopping up

Objectives

Explore the properties of different kitchen papers and disposable cloths. Rise to the challenge of mopping water from the floor. Which paper is the most absorbent? Which will be the best for mopping up the spillage?

Science Objectives
i) Describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials (1EM).
ii) Compare and group together a variety of everyday materials, based on properties (1EM).
iii) Identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper and cardboard for particular uses (2EM).
iv) Find out how the shapes of solid objects made from some materials can be changed by squashing, bending, twisting and stretching (2EM).

Working Scientifically

  1. Ask simple questions and recognise that they can be answered in different ways.
  2. Observe closely, using simple equipment.
  3. Perform simple tests.
  4. Identify and classify.
  5. Use their observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions.
  6. Gather and record data to help answer questions.

Teaching and Activities

Teaching

  • Make predictions about which paper would be best at mopping up a spillage of water (Yr1).
  • Consider the questions: are all makes of paper as good as each other? Or are some better than others?
  • Investigate which papers are the most absorbent by choosing a method and working in a group.
  • Understand the different reasons why people may need to use absorbent materials (Yr2).

Activities

  1. Create hypotheses and make predictions about the absorbency of different kitchen paper and disposable cloths.
  2. Investigate which papers are the most absorbent by choosing a method and working in a group.

Investigation - pattern seeking, problem solving
Are all makes of paper as good as each other? Investigate which papers are the most absorbent.
Year 1 - Make predictions about which paper would be best at mopping up a spillage of water.
Year 2 - Understand the different reasons why people may need to use absorbent materials.

Vocabulary
Material, properties, absorbency, waterproof, strong, weak, hypothesis

Session 5 Waterproofing materials

Objectives

Explore different fabrics and investigate their waterproof nature using a dropper of water. How can we make the fabrics waterproof? Colour them in with wax crayon and repeat the investigation!

Science Objectives
i) Describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials (1EM).
ii) Compare and group together a variety of everyday materials, based on properties (1EM).
iii) Identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper and cardboard for particular uses (2EM).
iv) Find out how the shapes of solid objects made from some materials can be changed by squashing, bending, twisting and stretching (2EM).

Working Scientifically

  1. Ask simple questions and recognise that they can be answered in different ways.
  2. Observe closely, using simple equipment.
  3. Perform simple tests.
  4. Identify and classify.
  5. Use their observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions.
  6. Gather and record data to help answer questions.

You Will Need

Provided Resources

  • Investigating fabrics resource

Additional Resources

  • Sticky notes
  • Pencil
  • A selection of fabrics
  • Pipettes
  • Beakers of water
  • Wax crayons

Teaching and Activities

Teaching

  • Understand that, if a material does not absorb water, it is said to be waterproof (Yr1).
  • Investigate the absorbency of fabrics by using a dropper to drop water onto the cloth. Observe and measure the number of drops and the time they stay on the cloth before being absorbed (Yr2).
  • Consider the question: How can we make the fabric waterproof? Rub wax crayon on the fabric and repeat the dropper investigation.
  • Discuss the findings and suggest explanations.

Activities

  1. Understand that, if a material does not absorb water, it is said to be waterproof.
  2. Investigate the absorbency of fabrics and the effect of adding a layer of wax crayon.
  3. Discuss the findings and consider the reasons for fabrics being waterproof.

Investigation
Investigate the absorbency of fabrics by using a dropper.
Year 1 - Investigate how to make the fabric waterproof.
Year 2 - Observe and measure the number of drops and the time they stay on the cloth before being absorbed.

Vocabulary
Material, properties, absorbency, waterproof, strong, weak, hypothesis

Session 6 Printing

Objectives

Explore the textures and properties of different materials by printing with a selection of items. Make a large collective piece of art showing the variety of materials used by the class.

Science Objectives
i) Describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials (1EM).
ii) Compare and group together a variety of everyday materials, based on properties (1EM).
iii) Identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper and cardboard for particular uses (2EM).

Working Scientifically

  1. Ask simple questions and recognise that they can be answered in different ways.
  2. Observe closely, using simple equipment.
  3. Perform simple tests.
  4. Identify and classify.
  5. Use their observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions.
  6. Gather and record data to help answer questions.

You Will Need

Provided Resources

  • Vocabulary Bingo resource

Additional Resources

  • Collection of man-made and natural objects
  • Sticky notes
  • Pencils
  • Poster paint
  • Large sheets of paper

Weblinks
Ideas for vegetable printing from www.goodtoknow.co.uk

Teaching and Activities

Teaching

  • Discuss the difference between natural and man-made objects (Yr1).
  • Sort the objects into natural and man-made and observe any similarities and differences between the two groups (Yr2).
  • Describe the textures and appearance of the different items.
  • Explore the texture and various properties (absorbency, flexibility) by using them to print with paint onto squares of cloth or card.

Activities

  1. Discuss the difference between natural and man-made objects (Yr1).
  2. Understand and sort the objects into natural and man-made and observe any similarities and differences between the two groups (Yr2).
  3. Explore the textures and appearance of the different items.

Investigation
Explore texture and various properties (absorbency, flexibility) by using materials to print with paint onto squares of cloth or card.
Year 1 - Discuss the difference between natural and man-made objects.
Year 2 - Sort the objects into natural and man-made and observe any similarities and differences between the two groups.

Vocabulary
Material, properties, absorbency, waterproof, strong, weak, hypothesis