Everyday Materials

Science Year 1 Marvellous Materials

In this block, explore a range of materials suitable for fixing a broken umbrella and test them using pipette to simulate raindrops. Working with play figures frozen in ice, devise an investigation to release them. Explore puddles and observe how they change. Think carefully about what is happening: can you explain why a puddle changes?!

Session 1 Mending a torn umbrella: Part 1

Objectives

Look at a selection of materials and consider which one is best for fixing a torn umbrella. Explain your selection and predict the outcome.

Science Objectives
i) Distinguish between an object and the material from which it is made.
ii) Identify and name a variety of everyday materials, including wood, plastic, glass and metal.
iii) Describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials.
iv) Compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of their simple physical properties.

Working Scientifically

  1. Ask simple questions and recognise that they can be answered in different ways.
  2. Observe closely, using simple equipment.
  3. Perform simple tests.
  4. Identify and classify.
  5. Use their observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions.
  6. Gather and record data to help answer questions.

Teaching and Activities

Teaching

  • Recap on how different objects are made from different materials.
  • Fix a torn umbrella, using materials they select for their useful properties.
  • Discuss their selection of materials for fixing the umbrella: what properties does this material have that makes it a good choice?
  • Discuss their designs and make predictions.

Activities

  1. Explore a range of materials with a view to fixing a torn umbrella.
  2. Understand some materials may be suitable whilst others are not, using the language of useful properties.
  3. Discuss and explore how to test the materials in an investigation and make simple notes about those thoughts.

Investigation - problem solving
Rise to the challenge of fixing a torn umbrella, using materials they select for their useful properties.
Discuss selection of materials for fixing the umbrella: what properties does this material have that makes it a good choice?

Vocabulary
Waterproof, absorbent, lightweight, breaks/tears, materials, properties

Session 2 Mending a torn umbrella: Part 2

Objectives

Test a selection of materials using a pipette to simulate raindrops and consider why some materials let water through and others do not.

Science Objectives
i) Distinguish between an object and the material from which it is made.
ii) Identify and name a variety of everyday materials, including wood, plastic, glass and metal.
iii) Describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials.
iv) Compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of their simple physical properties.

Working Scientifically

  1. Ask simple questions and recognise that they can be answered in different ways.
  2. Observe closely, using simple equipment.
  3. Perform simple tests.
  4. Identify and classify.
  5. Use their observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions.
  6. Gather and record data to help answer questions.

Teaching and Activities

Teaching

  • Investigate the materials for their useful properties, considering questions such as: how can we know that this material will not let the rain through? How can we test it?
  • Use pipettes to simulate raindrops and experiment with the different materials.
  • Observe and record the results.
  • Make hypotheses about why certain materials do not let water through.
  • Consider the question: if you did not have an umbrella, and it was raining hard, what other everyday objects could you use to keep the rain off your head? Why would they work?

Activities

  1. Understand, through exploration and investigation, that some materials are more suitable than others for mending an umbrella because of their physical properties.
  2. Be able to articulate their scientific reasoning for selecting and investigating certain materials.

Investigation - observing over time, problem solving
Investigate the materials for their useful properties, considering questions such as: how can we know that this material will not let the rain through? How can we test it?
Use pipettes to simulate raindrops and experiment with the different materials.

Vocabulary
Waterproof, absorbent, breaks/tears, materials, properties

Session 3 Ice observation

Objectives

Watch a block of ice melt and record the changes. Understand what happens to the particles in ice when it melts and act this out in the playground.

Science Objectives
i) Distinguish between an object and the material from which it is made.

ii) Identify and name a variety of everyday materials, including wood, plastic, glass and metal.

iii) Describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials.

iv) Compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of their simple physical properties.

Working Scientifically

  1. Ask simple questions and recognise that they can be answered in different ways.
  2. Observe closely, using simple equipment.
  3. Perform simple tests.
  4. Identify and classify.
  5. Use their observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions.
  6. Gather and record data to help answer questions.

Teaching and Activities

Teaching

  • Understand that water is a material and ice is water in a different state.
  • Consider the questions: how does the appearance of ice change as it melts? How long will the block of ice last? What will happen if we put salt on it?
  • Record observations and make predictions.
  • Understand what happens to particles in ice and water by role-playing the movement of particles in the PE hall/playground.

Activities

  1. Understand that water is a material and ice is water in a different state.
  2. Observe and record the changes to a block of ice.
  3. Begin to understand that what happens to particles in ice when it starts to melt and turn to water.

Investigation - exploring, problem solving, observing over time
Observe a block of ice and record the changes.
Devise an investigation to melt the ice quickly or slowly.

Vocabulary
Water, ice, melts, frozen, observe, materials, properties

Session 4 Frozen!

Objectives

Working with play figures frozen in ice, devise an investigation to release them. How can you melt the ice quickly to free the figure? Can you do it slowly so it takes a lot longer?

Science Objectives
i) Distinguish between an object and the material from which it is made.
ii) Identify and name a variety of everyday materials, including wood, plastic, glass and metal.
iii) Describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials.
iv) Compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of their simple physical properties.

Working Scientifically

  1. Ask simple questions and recognise that they can be answered in different ways.
  2. Observe closely, using simple equipment.
  3. Perform simple tests.
  4. Identify and classify.
  5. Use their observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions.
  6. Gather and record data to help answer questions.

You Will Need

Provided Resources

  • Ice Rescue! resource

Additional Resources

  • Large blocks of ice with play figures trapped (water frozen in bowls
  • Trays
  • Clipboards
  • Paper
  • Pencils
  • Cameras/recording devices
  • A selection of materials (bubble wrap, tin foil, paper, felt, plastic, etc.)

Teaching and Activities

Teaching

  • Understand that water is a material and ice is water in a different state.
  • Observe a block of ice and consider how to change its state.
  • Devise an investigation to melt the ice quickly or slowly.
  • Make predictions about the outcome and test those predictions in the classroom.
  • Generate questions about ice and water and consider why it is useful for people to know how to regulate the melting of ice.

Activities

  1. Understand that water is a material and ice is water in a different state.
  2. Consider, predict and then explore ways of speeding up or slowing down the melting of ice.

Vocabulary
Water, ice, melts, frozen, observe, materials, properties

Session 5 Puddle observation: Part 1

Objectives

Explore puddles outside and make your own! Observe what happens to a puddle over time and record the results.

Science Objectives
i) Distinguish between an object and the material from which it is made.
ii) Identify and name a variety of everyday materials, including wood, plastic, glass and metal.
iii) Describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials.
iv) Compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of their simple physical properties.

Working Scientifically

  1. Ask simple questions and recognise that they can be answered in different ways.
  2. Observe closely, using simple equipment.
  3. Perform simple tests.
  4. Identify and classify.
  5. Use their observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions.
  6. Gather and record data to help answer questions.

You Will Need

Additional Resources

  • Wellies
  • Water
  • Plastic sheets
  • Chalk
  • Video devices
  • Strips of paper or ribbon for measuring the puddles
  • Large sheets of paper


Weblinks
Children splashing in puddles from www.YouTube.com

Teaching and Activities

Teaching

  • Understand that water is a material.
  • Explore the properties of water by looking at puddles in the playground.
  • Talk and write about the best ways of observing and measuring how puddles change over time.
  • Measure and observe the changes in puddles and make predictions.
  • Make paper cut outs of the puddle over time for a class display.

Activities

  1. Understand that water is a material.
  2. Explore the properties of water by looking at puddles in the playground.
  3. Make predictions about the puddles and record them using chalk and paper cut outs.

Investigation - exploring, observing over time
Create puddles in shallow containers or plastic sheets.
Drawing chalk lines around the puddles at different times, measure and observe the changes and make predictions.
Create a simple chart, or series of diagrams, to show how the puddles change.

Vocabulary
Water, puddle, evaporation, bigger, smaller, materials, properties

Session 6 Puddle observation: Part 2

Objectives

Continue to explore puddles and observe how they change. Think carefully about what is happening: can you explain why a puddle changes?

Science Objectives
i) Distinguish between an object and the material from which it is made.
ii) Identify and name a variety of everyday materials, including wood, plastic, glass and metal.
iii) Describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials.
iv) Compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of their simple physical properties.

Working Scientifically

  1. Ask simple questions and recognise that they can be answered in different ways.
  2. Observe closely, using simple equipment.
  3. Perform simple tests.
  4. Identify and classify.
  5. Use their observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions.
  6. Gather and record data to help answer questions.

Extended Writing Opportunities
Recount: Write an account of puddle day.
Letter: Write a letter to an alien visitor to Earth explaining why puddles appear, change and disappear.

You Will Need

Provided Resources

  • Resource sheet for dance

Additional Resources

  • Wellies
  • Water
  • Plastic sheets
  • Chalk
  • Video devices
  • Strips of paper or ribbon for measuring the puddles
  • Large sheets of paper
  • Clipboard

Weblinks
Children splashing in puddles from www.YouTube.com

Teaching and Activities

Teaching

  • Continue to explore puddles and observe changes
  • Consider what makes a difference to how puddles dry up and the rate at which they do
  • Create a simple chart, or series of diagrams, to show how the puddles change
  • Use scientific vocabulary such as water, bigger, smaller, drying up, rain, changing, evaporation
  • Create dances, portraying the changes in a puddle and a block of ice over time, and perform The Puddle Dance and The Ice Dance to an audience

Activities

  1. Explore puddles and observe changes and exploring own ways of recording puddle changes
  2. Use scientific vocabulary such as water, bigger, smaller, drying up, rain, changing, evaporation
  3. Represent their observations and understanding through dances and role-play and through speaking to an audience about what they have learned

Investigation
Create puddles in shallow containers or plastic sheets.
Drawing chalk lines around the puddles at different times, measure and observe the changes and make predictions.
Create a simple chart, or series of diagrams, to show how the puddles change. (Exploring, observing over time).

Vocabulary
Water, puddle, evaporation, bigger, smaller, materials, properties