Fiction

English Year 5 Spring Short Stories

Spooky Short Stories

Study genre of short stories using Short! by Crossley-Holland. Investigate adverbials and develop use of perfect form to indicate time/cause. Write predictions and short stories.

Start with the core unit to introduce key texts. Then select from comprehension, SPAG and composition units.

Core
Unit 1 Core Unit: Read short stories, predict and analyse features
(suggested as 4 days)

You Will Need

Texts
Short! by Kevin Crossley Holland

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Introduce the book Short! by Kevin Crossley Holland. Read the blurb and then the contents page. Help children to make predictions about the genre of the different stories from their titles.
Activity
Read several of the Short! stories. Make a note of title and genre. Discuss how genre can be mixed.

Day 2 Teaching
Read three horror-type stories from Short! and briefly discuss each one. Identify the genre and make a list of possible features of horror stories.
Activity
Look in detail at a horror story from Short!: ‘Room for One More’. Mark the text and make notes about the features. Try to predict what will happen in the story. Listen to the story to hear how it develops.

Day 3 Teaching
Read a collection of sentences from the stories read so far. Talk about the stories that they come from. Identify words with silent letter.
Activity
Investigate spellings with silent letters, grouping words together. Think about how silent letters have arisen. Learn a set of silent-letter spellings for homework.

Day 4 Teaching
Talk about the origins of the stories in Short! and about oral story-telling. Listen to the first two paragraphs of another short story – Hunted - and predict how it may develop.
Activity
Read and investigate Hunted. Practise telling it orally. Discuss personal preferences about this week’s stories.

SPAG
Unit 2 SPAG: Identifying adverbials and using these to add cohesion
(suggested as 3 days)

You Will Need

Texts
Short! by Kevin Crossley Holland

Presentations
SPAG PowerPoint: Adverbials to add cohesion

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Read a version of Butterflies by Kevin Crossley Holland written without adverbials. Talk about the effect. Use a Powerpoint to introduce adverbials and come back to the original version of Butterflies.
Activity
Add adverbials to sentences from Short! by Kevin Crossley Holland. Examine sentences that contain more than one adverbial.

Day 2 Teaching
Experiment with a set of three time adverbials taken from The Song of the Syrup by Kevin Crossley Holland. Read these in context and talk about the effect that would be created if they were changed.
Activity
Explore making changes to sets of adverbials from Short! Examine a piece of writing that has a restricted number of adverbials and talk about why Kevin Crossley Holland may have chosen to write this way.

Day 3 Teaching
Practise an oral telling of Ouch! By Kevin Crossley Holland. Use a Powerpoint to explain the use of adverbials for creating cohesion in writing.
Activity
Tell and then write a version of Ouch!, using adverbials to add cohesion.

SPaG: Grammar and Punctuation

Adverbials to Add Cohesion PowerPoint
This presentation revises the formation and use of adverbials, including the use of prepositions and fronted adverbials. Children are then shown how these aid cohesion.

Composition
Unit 3 Composition: Use inference to create and write prequels
(suggested as 4 days)

You Will Need

Essential resources
Hunted (see resources)

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Read the end of Home from the Sea and make inferences about the characters. Speculate about the start of the story and then compare children’s ideas to the actual story.
Activity
Invent Back-Stories for five other stories from Short!, then enjoy hearing how they compare to the original stories.

Day 2 Teaching
Read the story Hunted in detail and speculate about the mysterious main character. Draw out inferences and work out what mysteries we are left with.
Activity

Work with a partner to invent a prequel for Hunted. Sketch out ideas for this on a storyboard.

Day 3 Teaching
Explore the style of the story Hunted. Discuss two prequels, one that matches the style of the story and one that doesn’t. Model how to start writing a prequel for Hunted.
Activity
Draft own versions of a prequel for Hunted, checking that their writing matches the style of the original.

Day 4 Teaching
Ask questions of another child, about their prequel and the decisions that they have made.
Activity
Work with a partner to question one another then finalise prequels, making changes. Think about what a sequel to Hunted could be and capture these ideas on a storyboard or in a performance. Enjoy some of these ideas together.

SPAG
Unit 4 SPAG: Using the perfect form to indicate time or cause
(suggested as 3 days)

You Will Need

Texts
Short! by Kevin Crossley Holland

Presentations
SPAG PowerPoint: Use of the perfect form

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Revise Past and Present tense with a Powerpoint. Look at versions of The Hook that have been rewritten in different tenses. Talk about the effect these have, which work and which are confusing.
Activity
Read the story Ouch! and use it to explore the past and present tense. Read a very muddled version of the story and identify the problems in it.

Day 2 Teaching
Read Tommy and the Ghost and discuss the story. Introduce the Perfect Form with a Powerpoint. Look at how the author has used the perfect form and think about the effect on meaning.
Activity
Change sentences from one type of perfect form to another. Then write about another story from Short!: Frost, Sun and Wind using the perfect form.

Day 3 Teaching
Read the Song of the Syrup and revise the Perfect Form with a Powerpoint. Look at three sets of writing about the Song of the Syrup: a prequel, a recap and a prediction. See how the perfect form has been used differently in each.
Activity
Write three sets of sentences about Gran’s Last Journey using the perfect form.

SPaG: Grammar and Punctuation

Use of the Perfect Form PowerPoint
Children revise tenses, including present and past. They revise the perfect form and look at how its use relates to what we know about time or cause.

Composition
Unit 5 Composition: Write a short story based on those read; use paragraphs effectively
(suggested as 4 days)

You Will Need

Texts
Short! by Kevin Crossley Holland

Presentations
SPAG PowerPoint: Use of paragraphs
Children learn how to break their writing into paragraphs, and decide the criteria for using these effectively. They consider how paragraphs contribute to cohesion and also the role of adverbs in linking these.

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Read and talk about the mysterious story Charger by Kevin Crossley-Holland. Find out how this story can be analysed.
Activity
Use the same analysis for other stories from Short! and talk together about what is discovered. Discuss some true and false statements about Kevin Crossley Holland. Decide on the audience for a class set of short stories.

Day 2 Teaching
Take one element from a story from Short! and use this to plan a new story.
Activity
Plan own stories taking one element from Short! as a starting point. Tell these stories to a partner.

Day 3 Teaching
Use Charger and a PowerPoint to revise paragraphs and think about cohesion between them.
Activity
Draft own stories, remembering to organise them in paragraphs. Read drafts together and start to notice any changes that could be made.

Day 4 Teaching
Look in detail at one child’s work. Hear first about what they were trying to achieve and then read their story. Ask other children to find what has gone well so far and to suggest improvements. Look in particular at paragraphs. Make decisions about presentation of stories.
Activity
Finalise and present own stories. Make preparations for sharing these with an audience.

SPaG: Grammar and Punctuation

Use of Paragraphs PowerPoint
Children learn how to break their writing into paragraphs, and decide the criteria for using these effectively. They consider how paragraphs contribute to cohesion and also the role of adverbs in linking these.