Fiction

English Year 5 Autumn Classic Fiction

Stories by Rudyard Kipling

Explore the charm and challenge of classic fiction with Rudyard Kipling's Jungle Book and Just So Stories. Study dialogue punctuation, relative clauses and commas.

Start with the core unit to introduce key texts. Then select from comprehension, SPAG and composition units.

Core
Unit 1 Core: Kipling’s style; characters; dialogue
(suggested as 3 days)

You Will Need

Texts
The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling

Presentations
Grammar PowerPoint: Dialogue Punctuation

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Introduce The Jungle Book as a collection of stories, published in 1894. The film versions are based on these but are quite different in tone and style. Read the opening paragraphs of the first chapter to ‘…there is no food here.’ Discuss what children notice about setting and characters.
Activity
Children read and discuss extracts from the chapter, ‘Mowgli's Brothers’.
MOST: Read Extracts 1&2. Use ‘Discussing a Classic Text A’.
EASY: Read Extract 1. Use ‘Discussing a Classic Text A’.
HARD: Read Extracts 1&2. Use ‘Discussing a Classic Text B’.

Day 2 Teaching
Discuss and list the characters met in The Jungle Book so far. Discuss how the animals have human characteristics such as speech and relationships. Model using ‘Extract 1’ (Day 1 Resource) to look for clues about characters and their motivation.
Activity
Children read ‘Mowgli's Brothers - Extract 3’, annotating and highlighting the text which informs them about each character. They create a concept map about the characters, noting key words and phrases which give clues.

Day 3 Teaching
Revise writing speech using PowerPoint: Dialogue Punctuation (see resources). Put into context the extract for today’s activity. Taken from the chapter ‘Kaa’s Hunting’, Mowgli is kidnapped by the Bandar-log monkeys and Baloo and Bagheera persuade Kaa to help them rescue him.
Activity
EASY: ‘Adding Speech Marks’ (see resources).
MOST: ‘Punctuating Dialogue’ (see resources).
HARD: ‘Converting drama to Dialogue’ (see resources).

SPaG: Grammar and Punctuation

Dialogue and Punctuation PowerPoint
This PowerPoint revises dialogue layout and punctuation, including inverted commas, commas to separate speech and reporting clauses, and interrupted speech.

Composition
Unit 2 Composition: Characters, motivation and dialogue
(suggested as 3 days)

You Will Need

Text
The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling

Presentations
Grammar PowerPoint: Composing Dialogue
Grammar PowerPoint: Dialogue Punctuation

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Reread the opening paragraphs of ‘Rikki-Tikki-Tavi’ from The Jungle Book to ‘…Who is Nag?’. Compare with the Mowgli chapters and put the story into historical context: English soldiers and their families were once garrisoned in parts of India, hence the English names and military references.
Activity
Children read the extracts of ‘Rikki-Tikki-Tavi’ (see resources), discussing Kipling's language, character portrayal and tension building.
EASY: Adult Led: Prompt A (Adult could read some of the text to group).
MEDIUM/HARD: Use prompt B.

Day 2 Teaching
Use PowerPoint: Composing Dialogue (see resources) to revise the conventions briefly for writing dialogue before exploring the differences in spoken and written language in Kipling’s writing.
Activity
Distribute ‘Conflict cards’ (see resources) and ask children to role-play one of the situations. They create a conflict scene and record dialogue in draft form for use in the next session.

Day 3 Teaching
Discuss 'Dialogue - clues to character and motive' (see resources), exploring how dialogue can give clues to characters’ personalities and motives. Children review scenes created yesterday looking for character clues.
Activity
Children write a short narrative, based on the conflicts they role-played last session. They should include punctuated dialogue, thinking about making that dialogue sound real and distinct from narration using techniques discussed last session.

SPaG: Grammar and Punctuation

Composing Dialogue PowerPoint
This PowerPoint revises dialogue layout and punctuation, before exploring the differences in dialogue and narration in Kipling’s writing.

Dialogue Punctuation PowerPoint
This PowerPoint revises dialogue layout and punctuation, including inverted commas, commas to separate speech and reporting clauses, and interrupted speech.

Comprehension
Unit 3 Comprehension: Comparing texts; plot mapping; point of view
(suggested as 3 days)

You Will Need

Texts
A Collection of Rudyard Kupling's Just So Stories by Rudyard Kipling

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Introduce Kipling's Just So Stories, explaining that they are origin stories. Share ‘Original Preface’ (see resources) which explains that they began as bedtime stories for Kipling’s daughter. Share opening of ‘How the Whale got his Throat’ & discuss the style and challenge of reading classic fiction.
Activity
Children choose from ‘How the Whale got his Throat’, ‘How the Camel got his Hump’ and ‘How the Rhinoceros got his Skin’. They reread chosen stories, discussing ideas and creating a concept map to support analysis.

Day 2 Teaching
Discuss Kipling's moralising tone and how he writes to influence the reader's opinion. What if the title was 'How the Sneaky fish tricked the hungry Whale’? Discuss how stories can be mapped. Plot a well-known story (see resources for example) and then edit details to change point of view.
Activity
Provide copies of Just So Stories. In pairs, children map out a Just So Story and then change details to reflect a different point of view.

Day 3 Teaching
Discuss how diaries can be like stories with a strong point of view, reading an example from the resources. Read and improve a diary entry from Camel retelling the beginning of ‘How the Camel got his Hump’ from the camel’s point of view.
Activity
Children choose part of their plan from last session and write as a diary entry. Challenge children to include authentic dialogue, carefully punctuated, which gives clues to character.

SPAG
Unit 4 SPAG: Relative clauses; creating characters
(suggested as 2 days)

You Will Need

Texts
A Collection of Rudyard Kipling's Just So Stories by Rudyard Kipling

Presentations
Grammar PowerPoint: Relative Clauses

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Remind children how Kipling's Just So Stories are origin stories with strong characters. Teach relative clauses, using PowerPoint: Relative Clauses (slides 1-5), exploring how Kipling influences reader perception. Use slide 6 to practise creating and embedding relative clauses.
Activity
Using resource, ‘Embedding relative clauses’ (see resources), children experiment with changing the reader's perception of some well-known characters, rewriting each sentence, adding an embedded clause.

Day 2 Teaching
Use slide 7 of PowerPoint: Relative Clauses to revise relative clauses. Show and discuss giraffe pictures (see resources) collecting ideas for an animal character description. Model turning some of these ideas into descriptive sentences, including relative clauses.
Activity
Children discuss, develop ideas and then write a description of an animal character. They can use the example of the giraffe or choose a different animal. They include punctuated relative clauses in their writing.

SPaG: Grammar and Punctuation

Relative Clauses PowerPoint
This PowerPoint introduces relative clauses, how they add more information about a noun and how to punctuate embedded relative clauses.

SPAG
Unit 5 SPAG: Commas for clarity: subordinate clauses
(suggested as 2 days)

You Will Need

Texts
A Collection of Rudyard Kipling's Just So Stories by Rudyard Kipling

Presentations
Grammar PowerPoint: Commas for Clarity

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Recap/explore what children know about using commas. Teach commas, using PowerPoint: Commas for Clarity slides 1-7 (see resources), exploring how subordinate clauses can be punctuated. Remind children that Kipling often wrote about characters with foibles. What if there was a character who was always telling tall tales?
Activity
Children play a game where they embellish outlandish statements (main clauses) by adding subordinate clauses. Experiment with position and how this changes punctuation.

Day 2 Teaching
Use slides 1-7 of PowerPoint: Commas for Clarity to revise commas (see resources). Show slide 8 and explore Kipling’s extended sentence style. Model writing a story setting, establishing character and setting, using subordinate clauses for extra detail.
Activity
Children discuss, plan and write a new story opening in Kipling’s style. Supported by a prompt sheet (see resources), they create and punctuate multi-clause sentences.

SPaG: Grammar and Punctuation

Commas for Clarity PowerPoint
Revise commas in lists and for fronted adverbials before focusing on using commas to mark subordinate clauses. Revise subordinating conjunctions and explore clause order.

Composition
Unit 6 Composition: Write an origin story in the style of Kipling
(suggested as 4 days)

You Will Need

Texts
A Collection of Rudyard Kipling's Just So Stories by Rudyard Kipling

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Discuss and list features of Kipling’s Just So Stories. Discuss ideas for a new origin story in the same style, using animal images with prominent physical features (see resources).
Activity
Children plan a new Just So story, discussing and developing ideas. They record their plan using a preferred format and check that they have a three-part story which explains the origin of their animal character.

Day 2 Teaching
Read the opening sentences of a Just So story, picking out and discussing language features: talking to the reader, extended sentences (relative clauses), repetition for impact etc. Add to features list and model applying some of these in a story opening.
Activity
Children write an opening to a new origin story, referring to their plans from Day 1, aiming to write in Kipling’s distinctive style. They use relative clauses to add extra information and extend sentences.

Day 3 Teaching
Briefly recap dialogue punctuation and explain why conflict can often result in impactful speech in stories, giving clues to character and advancing the action. Model writing/share a problem part of the shared story (see resources), using dialogue in this way.
Activity
Children write the problem part of their origin story, referring to their plans from Day 1. They should include a few pieces of punctuated, impactful dialogue.

Day 4 Teaching
Discuss what makes a story ending satisfying and list some useful last sentence ideas. Discuss ways to edit and improve children’s writing, making it ready to share with their audience. Compile an editing checklist.
Activity
Children complete their stories and then work to improve them, at first individually and then with a writing partner. Group support with an adult can be offered to children who need it as they complete and improve their writing.