Non-fiction

English Year 3 Spring Recounts

Diaries and Recounts

Through The Day I Swapped my Dad for Two Goldfish and The Diary of a Killer Cat, explore and write recounts. Study adverbs for time and place and direct speech.

We recommend that you start with the core unit, the heart of this English block of study. This introduces key textual material and sets the tone for any further units you wish to teach. These can be selected on the basis of the needs of your class – look at the green icons to identify the unit’s particular focus: SPAG, Composition or Comprehension. Whichever units you choose, we suggest teaching them in order, as there is a built-in progression indicated by the numbering.

‘UNIT PLAN’ gives you a text version of all parts of the unit to use in your school planning documentation. ‘DOWNLOAD ALL FILES’ gives you that unit plan plus all of the associated documents.

Core
Unit 1 Core: Introduction to recounts; improvising a swapping story
(suggested as 4 days)

Objectives

Spoken Language
-- Articulate and justify opinions.
-- Give well-structured descriptions and explanations.
-- Use spoken language to develop understanding through speculating, hypothesising, imagining and exploring ideas.
-- Develop understanding by imagining and exploring ideas.
-- Participate in discussions, presentations, performances and debates .

Word Reading
-- Apply their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes to read aloud and to understand the meaning of new words they meet.
-- Read further exception words.

Comprehension
-- Identify themes and conventions in books.
-- Discuss words and phrases that capture the reader’s interest and imagination.

 


-- Retell books orally.

Transcription
None for this unit.

Composition
-- Discuss and record ideas.
-- Build a varied and rich vocabulary and range of sentence structures.
-- Discuss writing similar to that which they will write to understand and learn from its structure, vocabulary and grammar.
-- Organise paragraphs around a theme.

Grammar
-- Use adverbs to express time.
-- Consistently use the past tense [Y2 revision].

You Will Need

Texts
The Day I Swapped my Dad for Two Goldfish by Neil Gaiman and Dave McKean

Teaching and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Introduce The Day I Swapped my Dad for Two Goldfish. Discuss and record a time when someone swapped something, then changed their mind. Read the book up to where the mother returns, and discuss the illustrations. Note the ‘lost’ notice on the first page of the book.
Activity
Children discuss with a friend something precious to them that they would never consider swapping. They imagine that they have lost their precious item and create a ‘lost’ notice using adjectives to compose an extended description.

Day 2 Teaching
Recap The Day I Swapped my Dad for Two Goldfish. Finish the book and note that this is a recount of an imaginary event. Explore the key features of a story recount, highlighting the chronological order of events, use of past tense, and time adverbs.
Activity
Give children the mixed up list of events from the book (see resources) to cut out, read and order. Challenge them to retell the story using a range of time adverbs and adding in more detail.

Day 3 Teaching
Recap The Day I Swapped my Dad for Two Goldfish and explain that today children are going to think about swapping an object that they then decide they want back.
Children suggest possible reasons why they might want to swap something back.
Activity
Children improvise their own swapping story using the planning resource to support planning and discussion. They then perform their dramas.

Day 4 Teaching
Ask one group of children to re-present their drama from Day 3. Using the drama and the accompanying plan, model recording the swapping drama as a short recount story, written in the first person.
Activity
Children use their drama from Day 3 to write a short recount of a swapping event.
They write in the past tense and the first person. They also use a variety of time adverbs.

SPAG
Unit 2 SPAG: Adverbs for time, place and manner; writing 1st person recounts
(suggested as 3 days)

Objectives

Spoken Language
-- Maintain attention and participate actively in collaborative conversations.

Word Reading
None for this unit

Comprehension
None for this unit

Transcription
None for this unit

 

Composition
-- Compose sentences building a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence structures.

Grammar
-- Use adverbs to express time, place and manner.
-- Use and understand the grammatical terminology accurately and appropriately when discussing their writing and reading. [verbs, adverbs].
-- Consistently use the past tense. [Y2 revision]

You Will Need

Texts
The Day I Swapped my Dad for Two Goldfish by Neil Gaiman and Dave McKean

Presentations
Grammar PowerPoint: Adverbs for Time, Place and Manner

Teaching and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Read The Day I Swapped my Dad for Two Goldfish. Use slides 1-6 of PowerPoint: Adverbs for time, place and manner to teach adverbs. Then complete further examples on the board.
Activity
Children complete adverb activities to consolidate and develop understanding of adverbs for time, place and manner.

Day 2 Teaching
Revise adverbs using PowerPoint: Adverbs for time, place and manner, then show children slides 7 - 9. Explore the position of adverbs for impact and note the implications for comma punctuation.
Activity
In pairs, children cut up sentences and adverbs and explore adding adverbs, trying them out in different places, and using comma punctuation where appropriate.

Day 3 Teaching
Reread from page 11 to the end of The Day I Swapped my Dad for Two Goldfish.
What do children think would happen if the boy tried to swap his sister for a new pet? Discuss some possible events and then model writing a recount letter from the sister to her parents.
Activity
In pairs, children come up with their own ideas for a sister swap. They plan out key events and then write a recount from the sister’s point of view in the form of a letter to her parents.

SPaG: Grammar and Punctuation

Adverbs for Time, Place and Manner PowerPoint
Children briefly revise verbs before exploring how adverbs modify verbs and clauses, giving information about time, place and manner. They consider the impact and punctuation of adverbs, depending on position.

Comprehension
Unit 3 Comprehension: Features of diaries; and point of view
(suggested as 4 days)

Objectives

Spoken Language
-- Articulate and justify answers and opinions.
-- Develop understanding by imagining and exploring ideas.
-- Participate in role play and improvisations.

Word Reading
-- Apply growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes to read aloud and to understand the meaning of new words.

Comprehension
-- Read books that are structured in different ways.
-- Identify how language, structure, and presentation contribute to meaning.
-- Participate in discussion about books.
-- Identify conventions in books.
-- Draw inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and justifying inferences with evidence.

 


-- Identify main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph.

Transcription
None for this unit

Composition
-- Compose and rehearse sentences orally (including dialogue), building a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence structures.
-- Discuss writing similar to that which they are planning to write in order to understand and learn from its structure, vocabulary and grammar.

Grammar
None for this unit

You Will Need

Texts
Diary of a Killer Cat by Anne Fine

Teaching and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Recap recount features. Show The Diary of a Killer Cat. Discuss what a diary is, noting that they are usually recounts. Read Chapters 1 & 2. Highlight features of a diary noting: tense, who is writing, feelings and point of view.
Activity
Children analyse, through group discussion, three different diary extracts using questions provided.

Day 2 Teaching
Read Chapter 4 and look at questions about the diary. Note the difference between a recall question and an inference question. Model writing answers for the questions.
Activity
Children read text from Chapter 5 and discuss recall and inference questions about the text. They highlight the key features of a diary.

Day 3 Teaching
Read Chapter 6 of The Diary of a Killer Cat. Discuss Tuffy’s and Dad’s very different points of view on the cat-flap being nailed up. Look at statements and decide whose point of view they are written from. Then hot seat Tuffy Vs Dad.
Activity
Children work in pairs to hot seat Tuffy and one of the other characters. They use prompt questions to help them consider two points of view then record the conversation between the two characters, in role in two speech bubbles.

Day 4 Teaching
Read Chapter 7 and discuss what really happened to Thumper. Create a timeline of these events and ask children how various characters will now be feeling.
Explain that Tuffy needs to file a police statement outlining what really happened that night.
Activity
Children write a police statement from Tuffy recounting what actually happened to the rabbit. They use the key events outlined in the shared timeline as prompts.

SPAG
Unit 4 SPAG: Writing and punctuating direct speech
(suggested as 4 days)

Objectives

Spoken Language
-- Participate in discussions and performances.

Word Reading
None for this unit

Comprehension
-- Identify themes and conventions in books.
-- Draw inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings and thoughts.
-- Predict what might happen from details stated and implied.

 

Transcription
-- Increase the legibility, consistency and quality of handwriting.

Composition
-- Compose sentences with an increasing range of structures.

Grammar
-- Use and punctuate direct speech.

You Will Need

Presentations
Grammar PowerPoint: Punctuating Direct Speech

Group Readers
Diary of a Lively Labrador by Ruth Merttens Hamilton Group Reader

Teaching and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Introduce or recap what diaries are. Shared read Diary of a Lively Labrador pages 1-8. Look at the use of speech marks and discuss the punctuation. Then discuss what sort of deep conversations Mouse and Boof-Head might have.
Activity
Children decide on a topic for a Boof-Head and Mouse conversation. They role play and then record the conversation in speech bubbles.

Day 2 Teaching
Recap direct speech. Use PowerPoint: Punctuating Direct Speech to teach how direct speech is punctuated. Children suggest possible reporting clauses for a conversation between Boof-Head and Mouse. Then note how actions or descriptions can be incorporated.
Activity
Children use their speech from Day 1 and write it out as punctuated speech with reporting clauses and action or description. They use careful and clear joined handwriting.

Day 3 Teaching
Read pages 17-18 of Diary of a Lively Labrador. Note the direct speech. Read just the dialogue with correct intonation and discuss. Children then make predictions about what Mouse’s plan might be.
Activity
Children reread pages 17-18 and circle the speech marks and highlight the dialogue.
They read just the dialogue using intonation, then read ‘Tuesday’ of week 2 and discuss predictions. Children then read the rest of the story in groups.

Day 4 Teaching
Display slides 10-14 PowerPoint: Punctuating Direct Speech, spotting errors and suggesting corrections. Make a list of reminders for accurate written dialogue. Display and reread Tuesday (page 2) of Diary of a Lively Labrador. I wonder what the postwoman wrote in her diary for that day.
Activity
Children write an entry for day two of the diary from the perspective of the postwoman. They record who she delivers letters to and who she chats to, ensuring they write conversations using direct speech.

SPaG: Grammar and Punctuation

Punctuating Direct Speech PowerPoint
Teach the conventions for writing direct speech, including speech marks, reporting clauses, commas and starting new lines with every speaker change. Spot and correct errors in punctuated speech.

Group Readers

Diary of a Lively Labrador
Diary of a Lively Labrador, by Ruth Merttens, uses the recount form of a traditional diary to tell the story of a Labrador who enlists an unlikely accomplice to help him get back into his mistress’s good books after a prolonged period of bad behaviour. The narrative is lively and humorous and children of 7 and over who are not necessarily wholly confident readers will find it easily accessible.

You can purchase printed copies of this Group Reader from Hamilton Education.

Comprehension
Unit 5 Composition: Write a diary in the style of one read
(suggested as 5 days)

Objectives

Spoken Language
-- Maintain attention and participate actively in collaborative conversations, staying on topic and initiating and responding to comments.
-- Develop understanding by imagining and exploring ideas.

Word Reading
None for this unit

Comprehension
None for this unit

Transcription
-- Use dictionaries to check the spelling and meaning of words.
-- Increase the legibility, consistency and quality of handwriting.

 

Composition
-- Discuss writing similar to that which they are planning to write in order to understand and learn from its structure, vocabulary and grammar.
-- Discuss and record ideas.
-- Compose using a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence structures Create settings, characters and plot.
-- Assess the effectiveness of writing and suggest improvements.
-- Proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors.

Grammar
-- Use adverbs to express time and cause.
-- Use and punctuate direct speech.

You Will Need

Texts
Diary of a Killer Cat by Anne Fine

Presentations
Grammar PowerPoint: Adverbs for Time, Place and Manner
Grammar PowerPoint: Punctuating Direct Speech

Group Readers
Diary of a Lively Labrador by Ruth Merttens Hamilton Group Reader

Teaching and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Reread a section of Diary of a Lively Labrador or Diary of a Killer Cat to investigate the idea of troublesome character traits. Discuss and model creating a flawed character to star in a new diary.
Activity
Children decide on their animal character, name it alliteratively, develop their ideas in role and note down a brief character profile.

Day 2 Teaching
Revise features of diaries. Model how to plan a diary, recounting events in a week of the flawed character. Explain that the troubles should build up to a problem that is then solved.
Activity
Children plan the key events for their diary considering: What events happen? What is the problem? How is it resolved?

Day 3 Teaching
Revise adverbs and note how they can add detail and tension to diaries. Children then sort adverbs into a ‘time’, ‘place’ or ‘manner’ hoop. Model writing the first day of a diary (Monday) based on your modelled plan from Day 1. Include adverbs.
Activity
Children write the first few days of their diary. They expand their planning ideas into sentences, remembering to use past tense and first person. They should incorporate a range of time, place and manner adverbs.

Day 4 Teaching
Revise punctuating speech. Ask children to share any punctuated dialogue they have used so far in their diaries. Note how this adds a different dimension to the diary. Model writing another paragraph that includes speech.
Activity
Children write the next couple of days of their diary. They include some punctuated dialogue. Children should ensure that the diary ends by resolving their problem.

Day 5 Teaching
Share some writing by a child in the class (with permission) and model improving and editing it. Include checking for tense, person, adverbs before you check spellings, grammar and punctuation. Highlight the importance of legible handwriting.
Activity
Children improve and edit their diaries making sure they flow logically in chronological order and use the features of a good diary. Children then write up their diaries neatly using clear handwriting with accurate joins.

SPaG: Grammar and Punctuation

Adverbs for Time, Place and Manner PowerPoint
Children briefly revise verbs before exploring how adverbs modify verbs and clauses, giving information about time, place and manner. They consider the impact and punctuation of adverbs, depending on position.

Punctuating Direct Speech PowerPoint
Teach the conventions for writing direct speech, including speech marks, reporting clauses, commas and starting new lines with every speaker change. Spot and correct errors in punctuated speech.

Group Readers

Diary of a Lively Labrador
Diary of a Lively Labrador, by Ruth Merttens, uses the recount form of a traditional diary to tell the story of a Labrador who enlists an unlikely accomplice to help him get back into his mistress’s good books after a prolonged period of bad behaviour. The narrative is lively and humorous and children of 7 and over who are not necessarily wholly confident readers will find it easily accessible.

You can purchase printed copies of this Group Reader from Hamilton Education.