Non-fiction

English Year 2 Summer Recounts

Reading and Writing Recounts

Inspire children to write creative recounts by reading great imaginative texts, including The Velveteen Rabbit. Grammar includes subordinate clauses, present and past progressive verbs.

Start with the core unit to introduce key texts. Then select from comprehension, SPAG and composition units.

Core
Unit 1 Core: Exploring a recount of a sequence of imaginary events
(suggested as 4 days)

You Will Need

Texts
Maisie’s Dragon by Philippa Danvers (provided below)

Optional texts
Dogger by Shirley Hughes

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Read the start of Maisie’s Dragon by Phillipa Danvers. Think of the questions that you would ask Maisie and see how they are answered on the first page of the book. Read the events up until the point that Maisie is lost.
Activity
Use sorting cards to talk about and re-tell the events from Maisie’s Dragon. Introduce Time Connectives as the events are recounted.

Day 2 Teaching
Use a Recount Diagram to remember the events from Maisie’s Dragon. Talk about different possible conclusions.
Activity
Work with a partner to draw and write possible conclusions to Maisie’s Dragon. Read the conclusion from the book and record it on the Recount Diagram.

Day 3 Teaching
Use a Recount Plan to note the introduction, events and conclusion of Maisie’s Dragon. Model how some of these details can be changed to create a new recount.
Activity
Record ideas for a new recount, working individually and with a partner. Talk through events, using time connectives.

Day 4 Teaching
Model using the Recount Plan in order to write a new version. Show how you use time connectives as you do this.
Activity
Children write their recounts in sentences. They evaluate their work with a partner. Finish by enjoying and discussing Dogger by Shirley Hughes and recording events from this book on a Recount Diagram.

Animated Tale

Maisie's Dragon

A whimsical fantasy story with repeating patterns. Maisie awakens to find her pet dragon has disappeared. She goes on a hunt to find him and on the way encounters characters with alliterative names, such as the tall teacher, short shopkeeper and bossy builder! Exhausted and seemingly out of luck, she returns home, only to find him curled up on his bed in her room. The final slide shows a story map of Maisie’s hunt, giving children a perfect opportunity to recount the story in their own words.

SPAG
Unit 2 SPAG: Subordination and Coordination: Conjunctions
(suggested as 3 days)

You Will Need

Texts
I Love You, Blue Kangaroo! by Emma Chichester Clark
Maisie’s Dragon by Philippa Danvers (provided below)

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Read I Love You, Blue Kangaroo by Emma Chichester Clark, making comparisons with Maisie’s Dragon. Use a sentence from the book to introduce and talk about the idea of coordinating conjunctions.
Activity
Read sentences about the first part of the book, cut them out and experiment with combining them using coordinating conjunctions. Write some of these as complete sentences.

Day 2 Teaching
Tell the events from I Love You, Blue Kangaroo. Use sentences from the book to introduce and explain about subordinating conjunctions.
Activity
Read sentences about Lily’s birthday and then add a subordinating conjunction and a subordinate clause to them. Write some of these as complete sentences.

Day 3 Teaching
Re-tell the events from I Love you, Blue Kangaroo. Look closely at the illustration of the baby’s bedroom. Read a description of this and identify the conjunctions that have been used.
Activity
Discuss and then write a description of Lily’s bedroom, using conjunctions for coordination and subordination. Introduce and talk about The Velveteen Rabbit, which is used in Unit 4.

Animated Tale

Maisie's Dragon

A whimsical fantasy story with repeating patterns. Maisie awakens to find her pet dragon has disappeared. She goes on a hunt to find him and on the way encounters characters with alliterative names, such as the tall teacher, short shopkeeper and bossy builder! Exhausted and seemingly out of luck, she returns home, only to find him curled up on his bed in her room. The final slide shows a story map of Maisie’s hunt, giving children a perfect opportunity to recount the story in their own words.

Comprehension
Unit 3 Comprehension: Reading and discussing recounts
(suggested as 4 days)

You Will Need

Texts
The Dragon Machine by Helen Ward

Group Readers
Boris and Sid go camping (provided below)

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Read the first half of The Dragon Machine by Helen Ward, looking carefully at the illustrations and discussing the vocabulary. Make predictions about what might happen next.
Activity
Use sentences or images to sequence the events from the first half of The Dragon Machine. Retell the events to a partner. Talk together about whether and why the events have to be in a particular order.

Day 2 Teaching
Read the second half of The Dragon Machine by Helen Ward. Talk about the events and George’s feelings.
Activity
Work with a partner to read the text or a summary of the second half of The Dragon Machine. Write sentences to summarise these events. Use a Recount Diagram to make a record of the events.

Day 3 Teaching
Introduce the characters of Boris and Sid and read a more challenging version of Boris and Sid Go Camping. Use a Recount Diagram to make a record of events.
Activity
Read the Hamilton Group Reader: Boris and Sid Go Camping or, for a challenge, the harder version. Write answers to questions about this set of events.

Day 4 Teaching
Revisit the characters of Maisie, George, Boris and Sid. Talk about how they are all imaginary. Think of ideas for other events that could happen to them. Model how to record these on a simple New Events chart.
Activity
Work with a partner to talk about ideas for new events for either Boris and Sid or George. Record these on a New Events chart and then tell them to a new partner. Work together to record one child’s ideas on a Recount Diagram.

Group Readers

Boris and Sid go camping

This gives an account, told from a child’s perspective, of a fun camping trip where it rains – and rains! Many children will empathise with the familiar context while reading this simple recount.

You can purchase printed copies of this Group Reader from Hamilton Education.

SPAG
Unit 4 SPAG: Present and past progressive verb forms
(suggested as 3 days)

You Will Need

Texts
The Velveteen Rabbit by Margery Williams

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Read or tell the first part of The Velveteen Rabbit by Margery Williams. Look at the Christmas Morning illustration from the book and use sentences about this picture to revise the past and present tense and to introduce the progressive form.
Activity
Read and sort sentences into the past and present tense. Spend time talking about the Skin Horse’s conversation with the rabbit.

Day 2 Teaching
Read or tell the next part of The Velveteen Rabbit. Look at the illustration on the front cover. Write sentences about what is happening in this picture and use a Grammar Poster to introduce the present progressive form.
Activity
Look closely at four more illustrations from the book and then write sentences, in the present progressive form about what is happening in each of them. Make predictions about how the story will end.

Day 3 Teaching
Read or tell the end of the story and talk about it together. Use the Fairy Flower illustration to think about what the boy was doing while this was happening. Write a sentence together and use this and the Grammar Poster to introduce the past progressive form.
Activity
Imagine what the boy was doing for each of the four illustrations from the book and then write sentences in the past progressive form. Talk together about how The Velveteen Rabbit compares with the other imaginary recounts we have read.

Composition
Unit 5 Composition: Writing recounts
(suggested as 4 days)

You Will Need

Text
Maisie’s Dragon by Philippa Danvers (provided below)

Planning and Activities

Day 1
Children plan a recount in the format of an anecdote – where the stimulus is ‘Guess what happened to me…’. Children re-read a recount in this form, and then brainstorm ideas for suitable anecdotes of their own.
Activity
Drawing on familiar examples, children use a planning stimulus Recount Questions (see resources) to generate and create ideas and to begin to record these in a useful format.

Day 2
Children look at examples of suggested ideas for their recounts and complete a planner together. They discuss how it does not matter if we have empty boxes on the planner, and also the importance of a good sequence and a conclusion to our recounts.
Activity
Children use the Planner (see resources) to record their sequence of events. They use words and phrases and also pictures as they feel appropriate.

Day 3
Display Recount Planner from Day 2 and also a Recount Diagram (see resources). Model and shared-write a draft recount. Include a demonstration of the use of time connectives from Unit 2 and past progressive from Unit 4 if you have taught these Units.
Activity
Children begin to write their recounts using the Recount Diagram (see resources).They complete their introductions. Remind children of appropriate time connectives to sequence their recount.

Day 4
Discuss the need to evaluate your own writing as you go, and to make additions and improvements before you produce a final copy for publishing. We shall make a class book or a display of all our recounted anecdotes.
Activity
Children work with a partner and read their partner’s recount and talk about where your feedback might apply. They then re-draft their recounts producing a final copy using their best handwriting. Use this for your performance, display or class collection.

Animated Tale

Maisie's Dragon

A whimsical fantasy story with repeating patterns. Maisie awakens to find her pet dragon has disappeared. She goes on a hunt to find him and on the way encounters characters with alliterative names, such as the tall teacher, short shopkeeper and bossy builder! Exhausted and seemingly out of luck, she returns home, only to find him curled up on his bed in her room. The final slide shows a story map of Maisie’s hunt, giving children a perfect opportunity to recount the story in their own words.