Poetry

English Year 2 Autumn Classic Poems

Poems of Edward Lear

Using Lear’s celebrated poetry, including The Owl & the Pussycat, children are stimulated to write & explore nouns, adjectives, prepositions, & expanded noun phrases.

Start with the core unit to introduce key texts. Then select from comprehension, SPAG and composition units.

Core
Unit 1 Core: Introduction to The Owl and Pussycat
(suggested as 4 days)

You Will Need

Poems
The Owl and the Pussycat by Edward Lear any version (see resources for illustrated version)

Websites
The Owl and the Pussycat from www.YouTube.com

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Introduce children to the life and work of poet Edward Lear. Watch an animation of Lear’s The Owl and the Pussycat before reading children an illustrated version of the poem. Rehearse with children how to commit short passages of poetry to memory.
Activity
Working in pairs, children reread The Owl and the Pussycat and begin to learn it off by heart. As they do so, they note down their favourite example of ‘nonsense’ in the poem, sharing these with others in the class.

Day 2 Teaching
Reread The Owl and the Pussycat and continue to extend the number of lines children can recite from memory. Sequence events in the poem’s first stanza. Teach children how to summarise short descriptions of events by removing unnecessary words and phrases whilst retaining key information.
Activity
Working in ability-related pairs, children discuss the sequence of events in The Owl and the Pussycat. They summarise brief descriptions of key moments in the poem’s narrative, comparing their work with others in class to ensure their summaries make sense and provide essential information.

Day 3 Teaching
Read and recite The Owl and the Pussycat once again. Explore how the original poem can be changed through adding new details and amending lines. Teach children to plan for their own changes by discussing ideas and making notes.
Activity
In ability related pairs, children brainstorm ideas for additions and amendments to The Owl and the Pussycat. They say their new lines out loud and record ideas as notes that can be used in tomorrow’s lesson.

Day 4 Teaching
Teach children to convert notes and jottings into finished lines of verse. Emphasise the importance of using properly formed letters, careful joins and regular word spaces when writing out a best copy of children’s modified versions of The Owl and the Pussycat.
Activity
Children refine notes made yesterday and then use best handwriting to write out lines from their amended versions of The Owl and the Pussycat.

SPAG
Unit 2 SPAG: Word classes
(suggested as 3 days)

You Will Need

Texts
The Quangle Wangle’s Hat by Edward Lear and Helen Oxenbury (book or web version)

Poems
The Owl and the Pussycat by Edward Lear any version (see resources for illustrated version)

Websites
The Quangle Wangle's Hat from www.YouTube.com

SPAG PDF: Hamilton Description of Word Classes (see resources)
This enables teachers to ensure that children are taught to identify nouns, adjectives and prepositions.

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Reading The Owl and the Pussycat by Edward Lear, consolidate the meaning of ‘noun’ and ‘adjective’. Model using appropriate and imaginative adjectives to compose lines describing a series of boats in which the Owl and the Pussycat might have gone to sea.
Activity
Working in mixed ability pairs, children discuss ideas as to what Bong trees look like. They draw or paint their vision of the trees. They label different parts of the trees in their pictures, using one colour to underline nouns and another to underline adjectives.

Day 2 Teaching
Read children Edward Lear’s The Quangle Wangle’s Hat and compare it to The Owl and the Pussycat. Revisit nouns and adjectives and model writing a short descriptive passage about the Quangle Wangle Quee’s hat.
Activity
Children work in ability-related pairs. They use images of creatures from The Quangle Wangle’s Hat to write ‘spotter’s guide’ entries using nouns and adjectives for their chosen animals. They finish by shared writing an entry for the Fimble Fowl.

Day 3 Teaching
Read children The Quangle Wangle’s Hat again. Use the poem and the Hamilton Description of Word Classes to teach children about prepositions. Lead children to identify prepositions in short texts and to select prepositions to complete sentences.
Activity
Children worked in ability-related pairs. They choose a creature from The Quangle Wangle’s Hat and write sentences describing where on the tree it made its home. They use adjectives to describe the creature and the tree and make use of prepositions to detail where in the tree the animal settled.

Composition
Unit 3 Composition: Rewrite a poem based on original version
(suggested as 4 days)

You Will Need

Poems
The Owl and the Pussycat by Edward Lear any version (see resources for illustrated version)
The Owl and the Astronaut by Gareth Owen (see resources)

Websites
The Quangle Wangle's Hat from www.YouTube.com
The Owl and the Pussycat from www.YouTube.com

SPAG PDF: Hamilton Description of Word Classes (see resources)
This enables teachers to ensure that children are taught to identify nouns, adjectives and prepositions.

Group Reader
The Pobble Who Has No Toes

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Read Edward Lear’s poems The Quangle Wangle’s Hat and The Pobble Who Has No Toes. Compare the character of the Pobble in each and help children to sequence the events in The Pobble Who Has No Toes.
Activity
Working in ability-related pairs, children discuss further what happens in The Pobble Who Has No Toes and then write a letter from the Pobble to the Owl describing, in chronological order, the events of his day.

Day 2 Teaching
Read and recite The Owl and the Pussycat once more before reading Gareth Owen’s The Owl and the Astronaut. Compare the two poems. Introduce the children’s project for the remaining days of the Unit – to first plan and then write the first draft of a story, The Owl’s New Adventure.
Activity
Children work in ability-related pairs to share ideas for their new story versions of The Owl and the Pussycat. They record ideas in note form, ready to begin drafting on Day 3.

Day 3 Teaching
Teach children to convert notes from a story plan into full sentences. Model the addition of adjectives to nouns in sentences to enhance description. Discuss the role of prepositions in further extending the descriptive force and focus of sentences.
Activity
Working in the same pairs as yesterday, children draw on their notes to write out the first half of their stories in draft form. They use adjectives to describe nouns and employ prepositions to extend sentences.

Day 4 Teaching
Confirm children’s understanding of how to use adjectives and prepositions to good effect. Underline the need to use initial capital letters and full stops in written sentences, even those in draft form.
Activity
Children continue and finish the writing of their new adventures for Owl in draft form. They share their completed drafts with one another and offer positive comments on others’ work. They begin to think about writing out copies of their stories in best.

Group Readers

The Pobble Who Has No Toes
This is a beautifully illustrated version of the famous poem by Edward Lear. The way that the text is broken up into sub-verses enables children to read it with little difficulty and there is a matching sound file to support them.

You can purchase printed copies of this Group Reader from Hamilton Education.

SPAG
Unit 4 SPAG: Expanded noun phrases
(suggested as 3 days)

You Will Need

Poems
The Owl and the Pussycat by Edward Lear any version (see resources for illustrated version)
Various limericks by Edward Lear (see resources)

Presentations
SPAG PowerPoint: Noun Phrases

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Remind children of the life and work of Edward Lear and introduce them to limericks. Read two limericks by Lear and compare them in terms of subject matter, structure, rhyme scheme and rhythm.
Activity
Working in mixed ability pairs, children read further limericks by Edward Lear. They select a favourite and copy it out in full using their best, joined handwriting. Later, they illustrate their limericks in emulation of Lear’s own decorations.

Day 2 Teaching
Continue to learn and recite The Owl and the Pussycat. Use PowerPoint: Noun Phrases to teach children about noun phrases, identifying the head noun.
Activity
Children work in ability-related pairs. They complete exercises which require them to identify head nouns and build noun phrases around them.

Day 3 Teaching
Use PowerPoint: Noun Phrases to explore expanded noun phrases and how these can be created with prepositions. Read Lear’s limerick There was an old man of Dumbree and help children to create expanded noun phrases for each noun in the poem.
Activity
Working in ability-related pairs, children rehearse creating expanded noun phrases using prepositional phrases. More able chidren read limericks and create expanded noun phrases from nouns they have identified in the poems.

SPaG: Grammar and Punctuation

Noun Phrases PowerPoint
Children learn how to use adjectives and also phrases starting with a preposition to add description to nouns.

Composition
Unit 5 Composition: Read limericks; write own limerick
(suggested as 4 days)

You Will Need

Poems
Various limericks by Edward Lear (provided in resources)

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Remind children of the life and writings of Edward Lear. Read three limericks by Lear and ask children to compare the poems in terms on content, structure, rhyme pattern and rhythm.
Activity
In small mixed-ability groups, children read a selection of limericks by Edward Lear. They note similarities between the poems and pay particular attention to the way the poems are structured in terms of rhyme and layout. They select a favourite to learn off and recite to the class.

Day 2 Teaching
Share two more limericks, noting the structure and rhyming pattern common to both. Model writing the opening line for a limerick of your own and explore how to use rhyming dictionaries and other strategies to generate sets of words that rhyme.
Activity
Working in ability-related pairs, children share ideas for the opening line to a new limerick. They make sure their line fits the standard format. They build up word banks of possible rhyming words as in the whole class teaching, ready to continue writing their limerick tomorrow.

Day 3 Teaching
Revisit work from Day 2. Guide children through the process of composing a second, rhyming line for their limerick. Reinforce the need for a limerick’s second line to have the same rhythm as its first line and that the two lines must rhyme.
Activity
Children continue to work in their pairs from yesterday. They carry on both sharing ideas for and composing lines for their limericks.

Day 4 Teaching
Complete a draft version of a new limerick and model proofreading and editing it for accuracy and impact. In preparation for children writing out their limericks in ‘best’, remind the class of the features of best handwriting, including well-formed letters, joined-up writing and appropriate word spaces.
Activity
Children finish their draft limerick and, having carefully proofread and edited their poems, write them out in best. They prepare to illustrate their limericks and consider ways to learn and recite their compositions.