Fiction

English Year 2 Autumn Fantasy

Just Imagine

The Bear and the Piano and Flat Rabbit stimulate creative writing. Use coordination and subordination to extend sentences, learn about past/present tense.

These aware-winning picture books by David Litchfield and Bardur Oskarsson together with an amazing story-telling video inspire imaginative writing in your class.

We recommend that you start with the core unit, the heart of this English block of study. This introduces key textual material and sets the tone for any further units you wish to teach. These can be selected on the basis of the needs of your class – look at the green icons to identify the unit’s particular focus: SPAG, Composition or Comprehension. Whichever units you choose, we suggest teaching them in order, as there is a built-in progression indicated by the numbering.

‘UNIT PLAN’ gives you a text version of all parts of the unit to use in your school planning documentation. ‘DOWNLOAD ALL FILES’ gives you that unit plan plus all of the associated documents.

Core
Unit 1 Core: Read, sequence and discuss written and oral stories
(suggested as 4 days)

Objectives

Spoken Language
-- Use relevant strategies to build their vocabulary.
-- Maintain attention and participate actively in collaborative conversations, staying on topic and initiating/responding to comments.
-- Use spoken language to speculate, hypothesise, imagine and explore ideas.

Word Reading
None for this unit

Comprehension
-- Answer and ask questions.
-- Listen to, discuss and express views about stories.
-- Participate in discussion about stories read to them.

Transcription
-- Write capital letters and digits of the correct size, orientation and relationship to one another.
-- Use spacing between words that reflects the size of the letters.

 

Composition
-- Write narratives.
-- Write for different purposes.
-- Plan/say out loud what they are going to write about.
-- Write down ideas and key vocabulary.
-- Encapsulate what they want to say, sentence by sentence.
-- Evaluate their writing with other pupils.
-- Read aloud with appropriate intonation to make the meaning clear.

Grammar
-- Learn how to use both familiar and new punctuation correctly (see English Appendix 2), including full stops, capital letters, exclamation marks, question marks, commas for lists, etc.
-- Learn how to use sentences with different forms: statement, question and exclamation.

Teaching and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Using The Bear and the Piano children follow this imaginative story and then discuss the character of the bear. They think about his physical appearance and his other characteristics as well as his feelings.
Activity
Children write a character profile of the Bear and discuss with each other how the bear is feeling at different times in the story. In the plenary, they listen to the rest of the story.

Day 2 Teaching
Children listen to an oral story, watching the storyteller on a video, The Little Story Who Didn’t Want to be Told. Children follow the story up to a critical point. They discuss what has happened so far, the story characters and their actions.
Activity
Children identify different forms of sentence and then use question words and write questions and answers about the story characters. Some of the answers maybe exclamations.

Day 3 Teaching
Children listen to the oral story again. Discuss the idea that listening to a story rather than reading it in a picture book enables us to imagine the characters exactly how we want to. We may each have a different idea about what a character looks like.
Activity
Children choose one of the characters in the oral story and write a description of that character as they imagine them to be. Discuss differences of opinion.

Day 4 Teaching
Children read the same story The Little Story Who Didn’t Want to be Told but presented as a picture book (see resources). They discuss the differences between oral stories and picture books, and agree the advantages and disadvantages of each.
Activity
Children work together to turn the story of The Bear and the Piano into an oral story. They sequence the story using story pegs, and then add detail to suit themselves.

Group Readers

The Little Story Who Didn’t Want to be Told
This is a story for children and grownups - both will love the neat twist at the end. The delicate and quixotic illustrations add to its charm and, even for the most reluctant readers, this is a real page turner. Children are made aware of the rich language of storytelling in this exemplary text.

You can purchase printed copies of this Group Reader from Hamilton Education

SPAG
Unit 2 SPAG: Expanded sentences: co-ordination and subordination
(suggested as 3 days)

Objectives

Spoken Language
-- Use relevant strategies to build their vocabulary.
-- Ask and answer questions to extend their understanding and knowledge.

Word Reading
None for this unit

Comprehension
-- Discuss sequence of events and how things are related.
-- Participate in discussion about stories read to them.

Transcription
None for this unit

 

Composition
-- Write down key words including new vocabulary.
-- Say aloud what they are going to write about.
-- Encapsulate what they want to say, sentence by sentence.
-- Re-read to check that their writing makes sense.

Grammar
-- Learn how to use co-ordination in sentences (and, or, but).
-- Learn how to use subordination in sentences (when, if, that, because).

Teaching and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Using the oral story The Little Story Who Didn’t Want to be Told, children identify examples of good elaborated descriptions. They see how the storyteller has extended sentences using co-ordination, and watch a PowerPoint on the use of ‘and’, ‘or’ and ‘but’.
Activity
Children use some prepared sheets with exercises involving identifying and using the conjunctions ‘and’, ‘or’ and ‘but’ in extended sentences. They begin to use the term, ‘conjunction’.
Day 2 Teaching
Using the picture book version of The Little Story Who Didn’t Want to be Told, children look for examples of extended sentences. Use the SPAG PowerPoint to teach subordination and familiarise children with the conjunctions ‘when’, ‘if’, ‘that’ and ‘because’.
Activity
Children identify conjunctions in a paragraph about the Red Gold Dragon, and then discuss which part of each sentence is the main clause.

Day 3 Teaching
Revise the use of co-ordination and subordination to add detail to sentences using conjunctions. Then discuss the role of the Crocodiles in the oral story. Where do the crocodiles come from? What is their story?
Activity
Children use extended sentences and conjunctions ‘and’, ‘or’, ‘but’, ‘when’, ‘if’, ‘that’, ‘because’ in writing their own version of the crocodiles story.

SPaG: Grammar and Punctuation

Conjunctions PowerPoint
Teach children about extending sentences using co-ordination (conjunctions: and, or, but) and subordination (conjunctions when, if, that, because).

Group Readers

The Little Story Who Didn’t Want to be Told
This is a story for children and grownups - both will love the neat twist at the end. The delicate and quixotic illustrations add to its charm and, even for the most reluctant readers, this is a real page turner. Children are made aware of the rich language of storytelling in this exemplary text.

You can purchase printed copies of this Group Reader from Hamilton Education

Comprehension
Unit 3 Comprehension: Read stories, make predictions, answer questions
(suggested as 3 days)

Objectives

Spoken language
-- Use relevant strategies to build their vocabulary.
-- Maintain attention and participate actively in collaborative conversations, staying on topic and initiating/responding to comments.
-- Use spoken language to speculate, hypothesise, imagine & explore ideas.

Word Reading
-- Sound out unfamiliar words accurately without undue hesitation.

Comprehension
-- Understand books read to them by predicting what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far.
-- Understand books read to them by drawing on what they already know or on background information provided by the teacher.
-- Making inferences on the basis of what is being said and done.
-- Answer and ask questions.

 

Transcription
-- Form lower-case letters of the correct size relative to one another.
-- Write capital letters of the correct size, orientation and relationship to one another.
-- Use spacing between words that reflects the size of the letters.

Composition
-- Plan and say out loud what they are going to write.
-- Encapsulating what they want to say, sentence by sentence.
-- Re-read to check that their writing makes sense.
-- Write for different purposes.
-- Write down ideas and key vocabulary.

Grammar
-- Use correct sentence punctuation: capital letters, full stops and question marks.

You Will Need

Texts
Flat Rabbit by Bardur Oskarsson

Teaching and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Read children the start of the award-winning story The Flat Rabbit by Bardur Oskarsson and discuss the characters and story so far. Ask children to make predictions about what will happen next.
Activity
Children write their predictions for how the story will resolve. They may also write about how they would like the story to evolve and how the problem could be sorted. In the plenary, children hear the rest of the story.

Day 2 Teaching
Re-read The Flat Rabbit to children and discuss the main character of the dog and also the illustrations throughout the book. Ask children to imagine that the main character was a cat instead of a dog…
Activity
Children write their own version of the story where the main character who finds the poor flat rabbit is a cat.

Day 3 Teaching
Return to The Flat Rabbit and explain to children that many people felt that this was a special book, partly because of the subject matter. Sensitively discuss how it deals with two animals finding a dead friend.
Activity
Children read an article on The Flat Rabbit and then answer comprehension questions on the article. They also write their opinion of the book giving reasons.

SPAG
Unit 4 SPAG: Identifying and using present and past tense verbs
(suggested as 4 days)

Objectives

Spoken Language
-- Listen and respond appropriately to adults and peers.
-- Ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and knowledge.
-- Use spoken language to develop understanding through exploring ideas.

Word Reading
None for this unit

Comprehension
-- Listen to, discuss and express views about a wide range of contemporary stories.
-- Answer and ask questions.
-- Participate in discussion about stories read to them.

 

Transcription
None for this unit

Composition
-- Plan or say out loud what they are going to write about.
-- Write down key words including new vocabulary
-- Encapsulate what they want to say, sentence by sentence.
-- Re-read their writing to check that it makes sense.

Grammar
-- Use past and present tense correctly.
-- Use appropriate sentence punctuation, including capital letters, full stops, question marks and exclamation marks.

You Will Need

Texts
The Flat rabbit by Bardur Oskarsson

Group Readers
The Day Ben Went Bump (see below)
The Animals' Outing (see below)

Presentations
SPAG PowerPoint: Verbs Present and past tense

Teaching and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Using The Flat Rabbit by Bardur Oskarsson and a Hamilton story, The Day Ben Went Bump, children compare style and illustrations recognising that in imaginative stories simple can be effective. Children are taught to identify verbs.
Activity
Children identify verbs in sentences in a text summarising one of the stories. They then write their opinion of the story giving reasons.

Day 2 Teaching
A second simple but imaginative story, The Animals’ Outing, is introduced. Then an entertaining PowerPoint based on the story, introduces how verbs have tense and tell us when things happened. We identify simple past tense and present tense.
Activity
Children identify whether verbs in sentences are in the past or present tense. They then write a sentence using past tense and one using present tense.

Day 3 Teaching
Children compare the two stories and see that one is written in the present tense and one is written in the simple past tense. The third story is also written in the past tense and it is pointed out that this is much more common in stories.
Activity
Children change the verb in a (differentiated) set of sentences from past to present. They then change the verb from present to past in a short paragraph. Finally they categorise verbs as regular or irregular in relation to the form of past tense.

Day 4 Teaching
The stories are again compared in terms of the tense they are written in, and children learn that stories are commonly past tense, and descriptions are present tense. They rehearse the forms of simple past tense.
Activity
Children use present tense to write a short description of a new animal in The Animals’ Outing and then use past tense to write a new end to the story.

SPaG: Grammar and Punctuation

Verbs Present and past tense PowerPoint
Teach children to identify verbs, then introduce the fact that verbs have tense: they tell us when something happened. Help children change the tense of verbs from present to past and vice versa.

Group Readers

The Day Ben went Bump
This is a really simple fantasy story about a child who falls through the floor and meets a variety of creatures in the ground below! Easily accessible for beginning readers, the children can use this to stimulate their own versions.

You can purchase printed copies of this Group Reader from Hamilton Education.

Group Readers

The Animal's Outing
This gives a simple account of an outing on which all the animals happily set out. They have a lovely day but, unhappily, not all the animals return. Why is Mr Fox looking so fat and happy at the end? Children rapidly engage with the recount and find the text easy to decode.

You can purchase printed copies of this Group Reader from Hamilton Education.

Composition
Unit 5 Composition: Plan, write and tell own stories based on those read
(suggested as 4 days)

Objectives

Spoken Language
-- Listen and respond appropriately to adults and peers.
-- Use spoken language to speculate, hypothesise, imagine & explore ideas.
-- Maintain attention and participate actively in collaborative conversations, staying on topic and initiating/responding to comments.
-- Speak audibly and fluently with an increasing command of standard English.
-- Participate in presentations and performances.
-- Gain and maintain the interest of the listener.
-- Select and use appropriate registers for effective communication.

Word Reading
None for this unit

Comprehension
-- Answer and ask questions.
-- Explain and discuss their understanding of stories.

Transcription
None for this unit

 

Composition
-- Write for different purposes.
-- Write fictional narratives.
-- Plan or say out loud what they are going to write about.
-- Write down ideas and key vocabulary.
-- Encapsulate what they want to say, sentence by sentence.
-- Re-read what they have written to check that it makes sense.
-- Proof read to check for errors in spelling and punctuation, especially end-of-sentence punctuation.
-- Read aloud with appropriate intonation to make the meaning clear.

Grammar
-- Use past tense consistently.
-- Use conjunctions to form extended sentences (subordination and co-ordination).

You Will Need

Texts
The Bear and the Piano by David Litchfield
The Flat Rabbit by Bardur Oskarsson

Oral Stories
The Little Story Who Didn’t Want to be Told (oral story) by Wilf Merttens

SPAG PDF Grammar revision (see resources)
This document revises the grammar taught earlier in this block: Extending sentences using subordination and co-ordination, and also the use of past and present tense.

Teaching and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Using The Bear and the Piano by David Litchfield and The Flat Rabbit by Bardur Oskarsson, imaginative stories in which animals talk and wonderful things happen are discussed. Children listen to a bit of the oral story of the Red Gold Dragon to stimulate them to invent a story.
Activity
Today children brainstorm and discuss their possible animal characters for their stories. They draw up a character profile of their invented character.

Day 2 Teaching
We look again at a section of the oral story: The Little Story Who Didn’t Want to be Told and explain that children will write a story for the dragon to tell. Story pegs are used to sequence the events in the two stories read yesterday.
Activity
Children have their own set of story pegs and they use these to plan out their story, which can be based on one of the two stories read.

Day 3 Teaching
Today we move into the writing phase and children are reminded, using a Grammar Revision sheet, of the grammar they have learned in this Block: past/present tense and extending sentences using subordination and co-ordination.
Activity
Children write their stories, using the Story Pegs that they created yesterday. They are encouraged to use past tense in writing their stories and also to extend their sentences using conjunctions.

Day 4 Teaching
A final look at the oral story stimulates children to complete their own stories, realising how to proofread these to check that what they have written makes sense and for errors. They then prepare an oral retelling of their story.
Activity
Children work to complete their story, checking that they have correctly written what they meant to say. They then prepare an oral retelling of their story, using story pegs.