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Upper Key Stage 2 Human Reproduction and Relationships
Life Choices

Be challenged to look after a Flour Baby for a week as in Anne Fine’s book. Discuss how names are chosen and the meanings and significance of both first names and family names. Think about all the different relationships that children have with other people, leading to a discussion about marriage. Research marriage customs in different cultures.

Session 1 Life Choices (A)

Objectives

Science

  • Describe changes as humans develop to old age

PSHE

  • Discuss that people have different kinds of responsibilities, rights and duties at home, at school, in the community and towards the environment.
  • Continue to develop the skills to exercise these responsibilities.
  • Recognise what constitutes a positive, healthy relationship and develop the skills to form and maintain positive and healthy relationships.
  • Recognise different types of relationships, including those between acquaintances, friends, relatives and families.
  • Recognise that actions affect themselves and others.
  • Recognise how their increasing independence brings increased responsibility to keep themselves and others safe.

Planning and Activities

Look after a Flour Baby for a week as in Anne Fine’s book. Set up ground rules and name your Flour Babies. Discuss how names are chosen and the meanings and significance of both first names and family names.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To show responsibility in looking after a Flour Baby.

Children will:

  • Understand that I need to show responsibility when looking after a baby.
  • Appreciate that it is hard work to look after a baby.

Provided Resources

  • My Flour Baby diary
  • Example letter to send home to parents/carers

You Will Need

  • Enough bags of 3kg flour for each child in the class to have one plus one extra for you if required!
  • Copies of a letter to send home to parents explaining the activity the children are undertaking
  • Books that give suggestions for naming babies

Session 2 Life Choices (B)

Objectives

Science

  • Describe reproduction process in plants and animals.

PSHE

  • Discuss how pressure to behave in unacceptable, unhealthy or risky ways can come from a variety of sources, including people they know and the media.
  • Recognise when they need help and to develop the skills to ask for help
  • Use basic techniques for resisting pressure to do something dangerous, unhealthy, that makes them uncomfortable or anxious or that they think is wrong .
  • Understand that their actions affect themselves & others.
  • Recognise what constitutes a positive, healthy relationship and develop the skills to form and maintain positive and healthy relationships.
  • Recognise different types of relationship, including those between acquaintances, friends, relatives and families.
  • Understand that civil partnerships and marriage are examples of a public demonstration of the commitment made between two people who love and care for each other and want to spend their lives together and who are of the legal age to make that commitment.

Planning and Activities

Think about all the different relationships that children have/will have with other people, leading to a discussion about marriage. Research marriage customs in different cultures. Return to your timelines and predict hopes and expectations for the future.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To be aware of the importance of marriage and civil partnership to many people in many different cultures.

Children will:

  • Understand why marriage and civil partnership is important for many people and describe marriage ceremonies held in different cultures.
  • Be aware of the many different relationships I have within different groups or communities.
  • Express my hopes and plans for the future.

Provided Resources

This session does not need any provided resources.

You Will Need

  • Information books on weddings/marriage,
  • BBC Rites of Passage DVD
  • access to internet,
  • children’s timelines drawn in session 2
  • Resources to support teaching the difficult subject of forced marriage.