Certain places are very important in the Islamic world as their history is intertwined with the religion. Explore the histories of the cities of Mecca, Medina, Jerusalem, Damascus, Karbala and Istanbul.

Session 1 Historic cities

Objectives

History

  • Develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study.
  • Undertake an in-depth study of a non-European society that provides contrasts with British history- early Islamic civilisation.

Geography

  • Locate the world’s countries using maps, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities.
  • Present human and physical features using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

Teaching and Activities

Introduce all the cities mentioned and prepare a timeline and map with basic information about each.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To locate some of the Islamic world’s historic cities on maps.

Children will:

  • Locate historic cities in the Islamic world and mark these on a map.
  • Research online for information about the history of selected cities.
  • Mark dates on a timeline.

You Will Need

You do not need any particular resources for this session.

Session 2 City research

Objectives

History

  • Develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study.
  • They should regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.
  • Undertake an in-depth study of a non-European society that provides contrasts with British history- early Islamic civilisation.

Geography

  • Locate the world’s countries using maps, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities.
  • Present human and physical features using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

Teaching and Activities

Explore one of the cities in more detail and produce a resource pack for it.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To explore the history of one Islamic city in greater depth.
  • To find out about the physical and human geography of an Islamic city.

Children will:

  • Research the history of an Islamic city
  • Record their research on a timeline
  • Become familiar with the layout of an Islamic city and transcribe features onto a map

You Will Need

  • Children’s timelines from the first session

Session 3 Tourist leaflet

Objectives

History

  • They should construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.
  • Undertake an in-depth study of a non-European society that provides contrasts with British history- early Islamic civilisation.

Geography

  • Present human and physical features using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

Teaching and Activities

Share the results of their research with the class and work up a tourist map of their city, with information about events that happened there inside.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To present their knowledge about an Islamic city's history.
  • To create an information leaflet about an Islamic city.

Children will:

  • Recall and organise historical information about an Islamic city.
  • Create or annotate a map of an Islamic city.
  • Design and make an information leaflet.

You Will Need

  • A4 sheets of paper, pencils, pens
  • Copies of information leaflets of cities/historic houses

Weblinks

Tourist website for Jerusalem from goisrael.com
Tourism information for Damascus from wikitravel.org
Tourism information for Istanbul from lonelyplanet.com
Things to do in Karbala on Trip Advisor from tripadvisor.co.uk
Tourism information for Mecca from wikitravel.org
Tourism information for Medina from wikitravel.org
Pobble An on-line writing website which showcases over 100,000 pieces of writing, including examples based on Hamilton plans, where you could upload examples of your children’s writing.