What buildings did the Romans build and for what purposes? How did they solve engineering problems such as providing enough water for their towns and cities, and enabling the army to get from A to B. Study Roman roads, buildings and aqueducts? Build models, carry out scientific tests and make a presentation of discoveries.

Session 1 Roman architecture

Objectives

History

  • Understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.
  • Learn about the Roman Empire and its impact on Britain (architecture).

Design and Technology

  • Select from and use a wide range of tools and equipment accurately to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing].
  • Select and use a wide range of materials and components … according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities.

Teaching and Activities

Children study the types and architecture of Roman buildings, including the use of columns, pediments, colonnades, etc. They make a model Roman building.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To become familiar with Roman architectural style and recognise some famous Roman buildings and remains.
  • To make a model of a Roman style building from a range of modelling materials.

Children will:

  • Know about Roman building style and use of columns, pediments, colonnades, etc.
  • Make a model Roman building including authentic looking architectural features.

You Will Need

  • 3 or 4 cylinders
  • A large range of assorted cardboard packaging
  • Large sheets of card
  • Some triangular “pediments” of different sizes
  • PVA glue and glue spreaders
  • Plenty of A4 and A5 paper for columns
  • Glue sticks
  • Right angle triangles of thin card
  • Acrylic paint in pale stone colours
  • Thick brushes

Session 2 Testing the strength of columns

Objectives

History

  • Understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.
  • Learn about the Roman Empire and its impact on Britain (architecture).

Science

  • Set up simple, practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests.
  • Use results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions.

Teaching and Activities

Continuing to look at aspects of Roman architectural style, children consider the varieties of 3D shape which can be used to hold up the weight of a roof and further stories. They conduct a fair scientific test.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To become familiar with Roman architectural style and in particular the use of columns.
  • To make a variety of different shaped columns and conduct a fair test to discover the strongest design.

Children will:

  • Learn to measure accurately, fold and join a series of hollow paper columns.
  • Conduct a fair test to find which 3D shape makes the strongest column.
  • Understand the outcome of the test and record the results.

You Will Need

  • 3 or 4 cylinders
  • A box of 3D shapes
  • Plenty of A4 paper
  • Glue sticks
  • Flip chart
  • Calculators
  • A large number of each of the following metric weights; 100g, 200g, 500g and 1kg

Weblinks

There are no weblinks needed for this session.

Session 3 Roman arches

Objectives

History

  • Understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.
  • Learn about the Roman Empire and its impact on Britain (architecture).

Science

  • Set up simple, practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests.
  • Use results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions.

Teaching and Activities

Why did the Romans use so many arches? Children conduct an investigation on effectiveness of different shaped arches by manipulating length of span and measuring height and load bearing strength.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To understand how arches were used in construction and why they are so strong.
  • To gain knowledge of how forces act on arches and post and lintel style bridges.
  • To investigate the strength of different shaped arches developing skills of measuring, fair testing and collaboration.

Children will:

  • Understand why arches are strong and why they were used so successfully in Roman architecture.
  • Conduct an investigation on the effectiveness of different shaped arches by manipulating length of span and measuring height and load bearing strength.
  • Understand what is learned by the test and record the results.

You Will Need

  • Sheets of A3 card
  • A large number of books
  • Small play people

Session 4 Roman roads

Objectives

History

  • Understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.
  • Learn about the Roman Empire and its impact on Britain (roads).

Geography

  • Develop use of geographical knowledge, understanding and skills to enhance locational and place knowledge.
  • Name and locate counties and cities of the UK.

Teaching and Activities

Children learn how Roman roads were made and where they were built. They place Roman towns and cities on a map of Britain.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To understand how the Romans built roads and how many of these have survived over 2000 years.
  • To know the location of a number of different towns and cities across Britain that have historical Roman significance.

Children will:

  • Know how Roman roads were made and where they were built.
  • Gain knowledge of Roman towns and cities in Britain and locate them on a map of Britain.

You Will Need

  • Individual whiteboards and pens
  • Atlases/ road maps of Britain
  • A3 Printed road map of Britain
  • Highlighter pens
  • Flip chart with pens
  • Task prompt sheet

Session 5 Roman aqueducts

Objectives

History

  • Understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.
  • Learn about the Roman Empire and its impact on Britain (architecture).

Design and Technology

  • Select from and use a wide range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks (for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing), accurately.
  • Select and use a wide range of materials and components … according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities.

Teaching and Activities

Understanding how the Romans carried water using aqueducts, children begin to make a cardboard model aqueduct.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To become familiar with the construction and use of aqueducts to bring fresh water into the towns and cities.
  • To make a model of an aqueduct using paper engineering skills.

Children will:

  • Understand how the Romans carried water into their towns using aqueducts.
  • Begin to make a cardboard model aqueduct and research and present information on Roman engineering for display.

You Will Need

  • A long cardboard tube and a marble
  • 2 large cardboard boxes with the fronts cut away
  • 8-10 strips of card 40cm x 10cm
  • Other white card strips
  • 16-20 small cardboard rolls and an equal number of paper rectangles to cover them
  • PVA glue with spreaders
  • Access to computers
  • Reference books

Session 6 Finishing the model aqueduct

Objectives

History

  • Understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.
  • Learn about the Roman Empire and its impact on Britain (architecture).

Design and Technology

  • Select from and use a wide range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks (for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing), accurately.
  • Select and use a wide range of materials and components according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities.

Teaching and Activities

Children complete their model aqueduct and prepare and present information on Roman architecture.

Teaching Outcomes:

  • To become familiar the use of aqueducts and research and display information on famous aqueducts.
  • To finish the model of an aqueduct.

Children will:

  • Understand how the Romans carried water into their towns using aqueducts.
  • Finish a model aqueduct and research and present information on famous Roman aqueducts for display.

You Will Need

  • Half-finished class model aqueduct
  • Mixing pallets
  • Kitchen roll and cling film
  • 2 strips of thin card 10cm wide as long as the aqueduct
  • Access to computers and the internet

Weblinks

There are no weblinks needed for this session.