Poetry

English Year 5 Autumn Poetic Language

Making the Ordinary Extraordinary!

Make the ordinary extraordinary! Enjoy modern & classic poems. Explore apt word choices & imagery (simile, metaphor, personification), expanded noun phrases & relative clauses.

We recommend that you start with the core unit, the heart of this English block of study. This introduces key textual material and sets the tone for any further units you wish to teach. These can be selected on the basis of the needs of your class – look at the green icons to identify the unit’s particular focus: SPAG, Composition or Comprehension. Whichever units you choose, we suggest teaching them in order, as there is a built-in progression indicated by the numbering.

‘UNIT PLAN’ gives you a text version of all parts of the unit to use in your school planning documentation. ‘DOWNLOAD ALL FILES’ gives you that unit plan plus all of the associated documents.

Core
Unit 1 Core: Features of poems: expanded noun phrases
(suggested as 3 days)

Objectives

Spoken Language
-- Articulate and justify opinions.
-- Participate in discussions.
-- Consider and evaluate different viewpoints.

Word Reading
None for this unit

Comprehension
-- Continue to read and discuss an increasingly wide range poetry.
-- Identify and discuss conventions.
-- Make comparisons.
-- Identify how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning.

 


-- Learn a wider range of poetry by heart.
-- Discuss and evaluate how authors use figurative language, considering the impact on the reader.

Transcription
-- Use dictionaries to check the spelling and meaning of words.

Composition
-- Use similar texts as models.
-- Select appropriate grammar & vocabulary.

Grammar
-- Use expanded noun phrases to convey complicated information concisely.

You Will Need

Essential Resources
Some objects in a bag: a nail, a small mirror, a star shape, a magic wand, a packet of sparklers, a candle, coins, a fishing net, a fish.

Poems
The Words of Poems by Carol Ann Duffy (see resources)
A Matter of Holes by Grace Nichols (see resources)
Personal Helicon by Seamus Heaney (see resources)
Additional poems (see resources)

Presentations
SPAG PowerPoint: Nouns and noun phrases

Teaching and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Share mystery objects (see teacher’s notes) and then read ‘The Words of Poems’ (see resources). Make links to objects in poem – they are all metaphors for poetry. Revise poetry terms, including metaphor, define and list for reference (see resources for a list).
Activity
Children read a selection of poems in ability groups, discussing meaning, features and choosing one to recommend to the class.
Easy: ‘Don’t be Scared’; ‘A Matter of Holes’; ‘Sir Autumn
Medium: ‘Sir Autumn’; ‘The Satyr's Head’; ‘The language of cat
Hard: ‘The Satyr's Head’; ‘The language of cat’; ‘Daffodils

Day 2 Teaching
Display & reread ‘A Matter of Holes’ by Grace Nichols on Resource PowerPoint (slide 2), discussing impact. Use the PowerPoint: Nouns and noun phrases (see resources, slides 3-7) to explore conveying complicated information concisely. Discuss other subjects which could be observed closely (See PowerPoint, slide 8 for prompts: connections, tangles, patterns, shadows etc.)
Activity
In pairs, children choose a subject and observe carefully, making notes. They then use their notes to create expanded noun phrases based on observations.

Day 3 Teaching
Share ‘Personal Helicon’ by Seamus Heaney (see resources). Pick out powerful techniques: alliteration, powerful verbs/ adjectives, rhyme, expanded noun phrases etc. Model using this poem to scaffold a new poem about yesterday’s observations (see resources).
Activity
Children work individually or with a partner (who has the same focus) to write a poem in the style of ‘Personal Helicon’. They use their expanded noun phrases from last session and use some of the techniques discussed in the input. Provide a simplified scaffold (see resources) for most children to support their writing.

SPAG: Grammar and Punctuation

Nouns and Noun Phrases PowerPoint
Teach children a head noun is expanded using adjectives and other forms of noun phrase; show how these can be used to create powerful images.

Composition
Unit 2 Composition: Expand vocabulary; explore metaphor/imagery
(suggested as 2 days)

Objectives

Spoken Language
-- Use relevant strategies to build their vocabulary.
-- Give well-structured descriptions.

Word Reading
None for this unit

Comprehension
-- Discuss and evaluate how authors use language, including figurative language, considering the impact on the reader.

Transcription
-- Use a thesaurus

 

Composition
-- Use other similar writing as models for their own.
-- Note and develop initial ideas.
-- Select appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning.
-- Describe settings and atmosphere.
-- Propose changes to vocabulary to enhance effects.

Grammar
None for this unit

You Will Need

Poems
Sky-Artist by Grace Nichols (see resources)
Don't be Scared by Carol Ann Duffy (see resources)

Presentations
Resource PowerPoint: Sky Paintings

Teaching and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Share ‘Sky-Artist’ by Grace Nichols (see resources). Children discuss their favourite images in pairs. Discuss the inspiration that artists of all kinds get from the sky. Share sky paintings on PowerPoint (see resources) and collect descriptive words/phrases.
Activity
Set up children with art materials and ask them to observe and discuss the sky. Does the sky remind them of anything? Can children think of similes and metaphors to help them describe what they see? Is there any emotion attached? Does it make them feel happy, calm or sad? Children draw, paint and discuss the sky.

Day 2 Teaching
Read ‘Don’t be Scared’ by Carol Ann Duffy (see resources). Review the sky paintings children created on Day 1. What helped children create them? Careful observation. It is the same with observing for poetry, searching for the right words instead of the right colours. Can children develop observations into metaphors? e.g. the clouds are swirls of cream, etc.
Activity
Children use the scaffold (see resources) to write a poem with powerful metaphors and using most apt synonyms. Use Resources PowerPoint slides 18-30 (if needed) to revise how to use a thesaurus. Challenge most able to write to the original rhyme scheme (ABCB).

SPAG
Unit 3 SPAG: Personification and imagery in poetry, relative clauses
(suggested as 3 days)

Objectives

Spoken Language
-- Use spoken language to develop understanding through imagining and exploring ideas.

Word Reading
None for this unit

Comprehension
-- Read and discuss an increasingly wide range of poetry.
-- Read for a range of purposes.
-- Identify and discuss themes.
-- Identify how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning.
-- Discuss their understanding and explore the meaning of words in context.

 


-- Discuss and evaluate how authors use figurative language, considering the impact on the reader.

Transcription
None for this unit

Composition
-- Note and develop initial ideas, drawing on reading.
Grammar
-- Use relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose or that.

You Will Need

Poems
Sir Autumn by Grace Nichols (see resources)
Nightwriter by Tony Mitton (see resources)
Fishing by Rachel Rooney (see resource)
Halloween's Crumble by Joseph Coelho (see resources)
Six Facts About by Rachel Rooney (see resources)

Presentations
SPAG PowerPoint: Relative clauses

Teaching and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Display and read ‘Sir Autumn’ (Resources PowerPoint, slide 2). Discuss personification: giving human attributes to inanimate things. What is Sir Autumn like? Together build a picture of autumn as a person. What is the impact of personifying the season? Note the end of ‘Sir Autumn’. I wonder what Lady Winter might be like? Display images of winter (Resources PowerPoint, slide 3). Discuss ideas briefly.
Activity
In small groups, children discuss ideas using the ‘Lady Winter’ prompt (see resources) to provoke discussion. Once children have some ideas, they develop these into powerful images, by extending ideas or improving on vocabulary choice.

Day 2 Teaching
Using the PowerPoint: Relative Clauses, slides 4-11, discuss how relative clauses can be used to add detail. Record a list of relative pronouns on f/c for children to refer to later. Use slide 12 to encourage children to try writing their own relative clauses to add detail to the image of Lady Winter on whiteboards. Discuss punctuation.
Activity
Children review their notes for Lady Winter from Day 1. Developing their ideas from last time, children write a prose description of Lady Winter, using relative clauses to add detail.

Day 3 Teaching
Ask children what they think poetry does or is for. Discuss ideas around creating images and provoking emotions. Introduce the idea of making the ordinary extraordinary.
Poets try to present things from a new perspective which makes the reader think. Display and share ‘Nightwriter’ (see resources). At what point did children guess the subject of the poem? A snail. What clues were there?
Activity
Children read and discuss selected poems, thinking about how the poet has made the ordinary subject seem extraordinary, including devices such as rhythm, rhyme, alliteration, metaphor, simile and personification.
Easy: ‘Halloween's crumble’; ‘Nightwriter’;
Medium: ‘Halloween's crumble’; ‘Six Facts About’ (Light);
Hard: ‘Fishing’ (Poetry writing); ‘Six Facts About’ (Light)

SPAG: Grammar and Punctuation

Relative Clauses PowerPoint
Children learn to identify relative clauses and then use these in their own writing. They also learn the correct punctuation for these clauses.

Composition
Unit 4 Composition: Write poem, using relative clauses & expanded noun phrases
(suggested as 3 days)

Objectives

Spoken Language
-- Participate in performances.
-- Gain, maintain and monitor the interest of the listener(s).

Word Reading
None for this unit

Comprehension
None for this unit

Transcription
None for this unit

Composition
-- Select the appropriate form and use other similar writing as models for their own.
-- Select appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning.

 

-- Assess the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing.
-- Propose changes to vocabulary, grammar and punctuation to enhance effects.
-- Proof-read for spelling and punctuation.
-- Perform own compositions, using appropriate intonation, volume, and movement so that meaning is clear.

Grammar
-- Use expanded noun phrases to convey complicated information concisely.
-- Use relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose or that.

You Will Need

Poems
Quicksilver by Roger McGough (see resources)
I am a Writer by Joseph Coelho (see resources)

Websites
Listen to poets perform

Teaching and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Read ‘Quicksilver’ by Roger McGough (see resources). Children will write a poem where they describe an ordinary item and in interesting ways. Model this with a mundane object, e.g. a spoon. Model building up powerful images which require the reader to guess the subject. What everyday objects could children write about?
Activity
Children each choose an object and develop ideas for their poems. Display/provide ‘Writing Prompt’ to support (see resources). Encourage children to develop expanded noun phrases and add relative clauses.

Day 2 Teaching
Read ‘I am a writer’ by Joseph Coelho (see resources). Here, an everyday thing is described in extraordinary ways. Briefly recap features of effective poems and create a list of tips for poetry writing. Model using, ‘I am a writer’ to develop some of the noun phrases from Day 1 into a poem (see resources for example).
Activity
Children write poems about their mystery objects. They can use the modelled structure from ‘I am a Writer’, opening with the line ‘I am the_____’ with the second line beginning with a relative pronoun. The focus is on developing powerful images, so it does not matter if children move away from the original structure or choose their own.

Day 3 Teaching
Vote for children’s favourite poet and watch them perform (see websites). Discuss performance skills. Reading aloud is a good way to evaluate writing. Model this, showing children how to look for ways to improve their poems.
Activity
Children read their poems, finishing them if needed, and look for ways to improve them. They read them aloud, thinking about the rhythm and listening to the impact.
Children test poems on a partner. Children give partners feedback to help them improve their performance.