Poetry

English Year 3 Spring Poetic Forms

Performance Poems

Listen to performance poems and explore their features. Use conjunctions indicating time and cause. Investigate negative prefixes, informal language and rhymes. Write a rap.

We recommend that you start with the core unit, the heart of this English block of study. This introduces key textual material and sets the tone for any further units you wish to teach. These can be selected on the basis of the needs of your class – look at the green icons to identify the unit’s particular focus: SPAG, Composition or Comprehension. Whichever units you choose, we suggest teaching them in order, as there is a built-in progression indicated by the numbering.

‘UNIT PLAN’ gives you a text version of all parts of the unit to use in your school planning documentation. ‘DOWNLOAD ALL FILES’ gives you that unit plan plus all of the associated documents.

Core
Unit 1 Core Unit: Read poems and understand features, including ‘free’ verse
(suggested as 4 days)

Objectives

Spoken Language
-- Speak audibly and fluently.
-- Participate in performances.

Word Reading
None for this unit

Comprehension
-- Identify themes and conventions in a wide range of poems.
-- Prepare poems to read aloud and perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action.
-- Discuss words and phrases that capture the reader’s interest and imagination.
-- Identify how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning.

 

Transcription
-- Use further prefixes and understand how to add these in English.

Composition
-- Discuss writing similar to that which they are planning to write, in order to understand and learn from its structure, grammar and vocabulary.
-- Discuss and record ideas.
-- Compose and rehearse sentences orally, progressively building a larger vocabulary.

Grammar
None for this unit

You Will Need

Optional Texts
Poems Out Loud selected by Brian Moses
You Tell Me by Michael Rosen

Poems
The Torch by Michael Rosen (see resources)
The Witches' Brew by Wes Magee (see resources)
Picnic on the M25 by Paul Cookson (see resources)
Other poems (see resources)

Resources
Hamilton Sound Files (see resources)

Teaching and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Using The Torch, The Witches’ Brew and Picnic on the M25, children discuss performance poems and features of different types, using terms such as rhythm, rhyme, free verse, structured etc.
Activity
Children practise reading a poem and then work on one verse to perform it. The class then jointly perform the poem.

Day 2 Teaching
Children read two poems, Cool Cat and My Nephew, which use informal and conversational language. They discuss the difference between informal language and vocabulary and Standard English.
Activity
Children write a conversational poem about a meal time – either at home or at school. They make this humorous, incorporating features of the poems read.

Day 3 Teaching
Using I’m Not a Kid, children remind themselves of the features of performance poems. They then consider what they are ‘not’ and use this to discuss and identify negative prefixes: in-, im-, il- and ir-. Spelling patterns using these are highlighted and synonyms for the root words are generated.
Activity
Children write a poem using two or more negative prefixes. They then learn a related spelling list for homework.

Day 4 Teaching
Children re-read The Torch and then read together The Ssssnake Hotel. They revise features and discuss the effects of irregular or regular rhythm or rhyming patterns.
Activity
Children work in a group to read a poem chosen from Leisure Centre Pleasure Centre, The Ssssnake Hotel and Visit to Yalding. They work together to answer comprehension questions.

SPAG
Unit 2 SPAG: Conjunctions, nouns, adjectives, prepositions: adding description
(suggested as 3 days)

Objectives

Spoken Language
None for this unit

Word Reading
None for this unit

Comprehension
-- Discuss words and phrases that capture the reader’s interest and imagination.

Transcription
None for this unit

 

Composition
-- Discuss writing similar to that which they are planning to write, in order to understand and learn from its structure, grammar and vocabulary.

Grammar
-- Extend the range of sentences with more than one clause by using a wider range of conjunctions, including when, if, because, although.
-- Use conjunctions, adverbs and prepositions to express time and cause.

You Will Need

Optional Texts
You Tell Me by Michael Rosen

Resources
Hamilton Sound Files – attached to Unit 1

Presentations
PowerPoint SPAG: Conjunctions and Noun Phrases

Teaching and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Using The Torch, children discuss performance poems and identify conjunctions and clauses in the poems. They look at the role of a conjunction and what information they can add about the cause or time of the event.
Activity
Children use Don’t Tell Your Mother to identify clauses and extend those using conjunctions and subordinate clauses. They share their sentences, discussing the type of information added - is it about when or why or how?

Day 2 Teaching
Children use Don’t Tell Your Mother to look more closely at clauses and learn to identify subordinate clauses as well as main clauses. They work in pairs to have a go at writing their own.
Activity
Children work in pairs using My Brother and Me to look at clauses within the poem and extend them choosing their own conjunctions and subordinate clauses. They make this humorous, using imagination. They may add clauses at the front of the sentence.

Day 3 Teaching
Using The Dragon Who Ate Our School, children remind themselves of nouns, adjectives and noun phrases. They learn how noun phrases can include adjectives or phrases starting with a preposition. They work in pairs to have a go at writing their own.
Activity
Children use a prop and their imagination to write descriptive sentences about a dragon moving around the school. Using a word bank to help, they select suitable adjectives, prepositions and conjunctions to write their sentences. They share their sentences and illustrate them to display in the classroom.

SPAG: Grammar and Punctuation

Conjunctions and Noun Phrases PowerPoint
Identify conjunctions and use these to add subordinate clauses giving information about time or cause.
Create noun phrases using adjectives and phrases starting with a preposition.

SPAG
Unit 3 SPAG: Use apostrophes - for possession and contractions
(suggested as 2 days)

Objectives

Spoken Language
None for this unit

Word Reading
None for this unit

Comprehension
-- Discuss words and phrases that capture the reader’s interest and imagination.

Transcription
None for this unit

 

Composition
-- Discuss writing similar to that which they are planning to write, in order to understand and learn from its structure, grammar and vocabulary.

Grammar
-- Place the possessive apostrophe accurately in words with regular plurals [for example, girls’, boys’] and in words with irregular plurals [for example, children’s].

You Will Need

Poems
The Torch by Michael Rosen (see resources)
Fork Week by Michael Rosen (see resources)
Dear Mum by Brian Patten (see resources)

Resources
Hamilton SOUND Files
– attached to Unit 1

Presentations
PowerPoint SPAG: Apostrophes

Teaching and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Using The Torch and Fork Week, children discuss apostrophes for possession. They have a go at changing given sentences into those requiring apostrophes for possession.
Activity
Children have a go at writing their own pairs of sentences to include apostrophes for possession, before sharing them with the class and using the classroom to further stimulate such sentences.

Day 2 Teaching
Children use Fork Week and Dear Mum to look more closely at apostrophes for possession and contraction. They highlight apostrophes used for shortening words in Fork Week.
Activity
Children work in pairs using Dear Mum to write their own sentences with apostrophes for possession and contraction, clearly identifying which is which. They share their sentences with each other and role play the boy and his mum.

SPAG: Grammar and Punctuation

Apostrophes PowerPoint
Children learn about apostrophes, those used for possession, singular, including words ending in ‘s’ and plural, and those used for contractions.

Composition
Unit 4 Composition: Read poems out loud and write extra lines/verses
(suggested as 3 days)

Objectives

Spoken Language
-- Listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers.
-- Give well-structured explanations.
-- Use spoken language to develop understanding.
-- Participate in discussions.

Word Reading
None for this unit

Comprehension
-- Develop positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read by
preparing poems to read aloud, showing understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action.

 

Transcription
None for this unit

Composition
None for this unit

Grammar
None for this unit

You Will Need

Poems
No Word of a Lie by Jackie Kay (see resources)
Bedtime by Eleanor Farjeon (see resources)

Teaching and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Using No World of a Lie, children discuss features of a poem and what makes it a good poem to read aloud. They annotate a poem together as a class, looking carefully at a range of features.
Activity
Children have a go at reading poetry in groups using a Poetry Pack and then highlight and annotate them, looking for some of the features of good performance poetry. They perform a selected poem to the class.

Day 2 Teaching
Children use No Word of a Lie and the Poetry Pack to remind them of the features of poetry and then together share ideas about how to add lines to No Word of a Lie.
Activity
Children work in pairs using No Word of a Lie writing frame, to add lines to the poem, or by changing the repeating phrase and writing a different poem. Children then practise performing their poems in their small groups before performing them to the class.

Day 3 Teaching
Children use Bedtime to remind them of the features of poetry and together think of ideas for their own version of the poem.
Activity
Children work in pairs using a Five Minutes writing frame, to add lines to the poem. They go onto use a different writing frame which enables them to write a similar poem with a twist. Pairs of children join small groups to perform their poems, paying attention to powerful verbs, vivid adjectives and other features that need to be emphasised when reading aloud.

SPAG
Unit 5 SPAG: Understand and use dialogue punctuation
(suggested as 3 days)

Objectives

Spoken Language
-- Listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers.
-- Give well-structured explanations.
-- Use spoken language to develop understanding.
-- Participate in discussions.

Word Reading
None for this unit

Comprehension
-- Develop positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read by showing understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action.

 

Transcription
None for this unit

Composition
-- Discuss writing similar to that which they are planning to write, in order to understand and learn from its structure, grammar and vocabulary.

Grammar
-- Indicate grammatical and other features by: using and punctuating direct speech.

You Will Need

Resources
Hamilton Sound Files attached to Unit 1

Poems
Don't Tell Your Mother by Michael Rosen (see resources)
My Nephew by Wilf (see resources)
Me and My Brother by Michael Rosen (see resources)

Presentations
PowerPoint SPAG: Dialogue Punctuation
PowerPoint SPAG: Revision

Teaching and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Using Don’t Tell Your Mother, children discuss features of a conversational poem and look at the different parts with a view to performing it. Class reads different parts out loud together, including narration.
Activity
Children highlight different speaking parts of the poem and add reporting clauses to those speaking parts. They write their sentences on large strips of paper and punctuate the dialogue correctly.

Day 2 Teaching
Children use My Nephew and Me and My Brother to remind them of the features of conversational poetry. They then think of ideas for their own conversation scenes and talk about the rules of group work improvisation.
Activity
Children work in pairs or groups to improvise their scene, listening together and making notes in an Ideas Frame. They work at their scene being word-perfect and then write their dialogue down.

Day 3 Teaching
Children use Me and My Brother to look at the way poetry can be laid out to emphasise certain words and phrases and give the reader clues about how to perform it. Children are reminded about the correct way to punctuate dialogue.
Activity
Children work in pairs/groups reviewing their work from yesterday and then writing their conversation out, using the features of Me and My Brother and My Nephew. Children are given time to peer view and then perform their conversational poetry to the rest of the class..

SPAG: Grammar and Punctuation

Dialogue punctuation PowerPoint
Children learn how to punctuate sentences, including the use of a reporting clause in the middle of dialogue as well as after it. They also learn about end of speech punctuation.

Revision PowerPoint
Children revise dialogue punctuation and learn how to extend reporting clauses using appropriate adverbials.

Composition
Unit 6 Composition: Write a poem to perform
(suggested as 4 days)

Objectives

Spoken Language
-- Listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers.
-- Give well-structured explanations.
-- Use spoken language to explore ideas and develop understanding.
-- Participate in discussions.
-- Use relevant strategies to build vocab.
-- Maintain attention and participate actively in collaborative conversations.

Word Reading
-- Pupils should be taught to read further exception words, noting the unusual correspondences between spelling and sound, e.g. drought.

Comprehension
-- Develop positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read by showing understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action.

 

Transcription
-- Spell further homophones.

Composition
-- Discuss writing similar to that which they are planning to write, in order to understand and learn from its structure, grammar and vocabulary.
-- Evaluate and edit by proposing changes to grammar & vocabulary.
-- Proof-read for spelling and punctuation.

Grammar
None for this unit

You Will Need

Resources
Hamilton Sound Files attached to Unit 1
Poems
Write-A-Rap by Tony Mitton (see resources)
Everybody Rap by SuAndi (see resources)
Cool Cat by Mike Jubb (see resources)
Other poems (see resources)

Teaching and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Using Write-A-Rap and Everybody Rap children listen to rhythm and rhyme in these rap poems. They clap to the rhythm and identify features of rap.
Activity
Children make notes of features of a rap poem they find in Write-A-Rap. They then highlight the pairs of words that rhyme before writing them on a grid called Can You Find The Rhyming Pairs? Children go on to generate lists of rhyming words they will use in following sessions.

Day 2 Teaching
Children use Cool Cat and The Dragon Who Ate Our School to become more familiar with the use of rhythm and rhyme in rap poetry. Children begin to think about their own raps and practise generating ideas by working in groups to collate ideas and vivid vocabulary around a theme. They look at the stanzas in The Dragon Who Ate Our School to help them understand about structure.
Activity
Children work in pairs to collate ideas and phrases around the subject of their rap. They decide on the structure of their poem by focusing on each stanza and think of suitable rhyming pairs they can use. Children use online rhyming dictionaries and work together to do this.

Day 3 Teaching
Children use Write-A-Rap to revise the features of a rap and discuss a checklist to use in their own work. Together they think about the best way of starting to write their rap, including referring to their planning.
Activity
Children write the first draft of their rap, saying the lines out loud as they work, to check rhythm and read for meaning. Children are encouraged to work together to help with ideas, including rhyming pairs and opening lines.

Day 4 Teaching
Children use Can You Rap Gran and Mega Star Rap to identify rhyming pairs and the use of repeating lines. They review the features checklist and consider it in the light of their own rap writing.
Activity
Children work on the editing of their raps and then practise reading them out loud, trying to learn them off by heart. They then perform them to the class, individually or in pairs.