Poetry

English Year 3 Summer Poems on a Theme

Animal Poems

Use animal poems to stimulate discussion and analysis. Study description, expanded noun phrases and adverbs. Use them in writing poems about endangered animals.

Start with the core unit to introduce key texts. Then select from comprehension, SPAG and composition units.

Core
Unit 1 Core: Read a variety of poems, compare and analyse features
(suggested as 4 days)

You Will Need

Texts
Animal Poems compiled by Jennifer Curry

Poems
(All in resources)
Mother doesn't want a dog by Judith Viorst
Black Cat by Suzanne Elvidge
Claws by Tony Langham
Additional poems (see resources)

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Children bring in pictures of pets or animals they know personally. What is the difference between poetry and prose? Using a resource, children are introduced to some features of poetry: rhyme, rhythm, repetition, format, vocabulary, etc. They identify examples of each feature in two poems.
Activity
They read a particular poem and go through it carefully with a partner to annotate the different features. They discuss different opinions of the poem.

Day 2 Teaching
Revise the different features of poetry discussed yesterday. Explore which of these children like – e.g. do some children prefer poems with a regular rhythm? Do some prefer free verse? Add to our list of useful terminology.
Activity
They read selected poems and identify features. They discuss whether they like each of the poems they read and give reasons for their preferences referring to the features.

Day 3 Teaching
Discuss which are children’s favourite poems and why. Read two poems together: Mother doesn’t want a dog, and Black Cat. Discuss which children prefer and why. Today they are going to select a poem to memorise. What features of a poem will make it easier to learn off by heart?
Activity
Children read and re-read a set of poems. They then select one to learn by heart, and begin this process by writing the poem out so that they have their own copy. They then recite their poem until they have memorised it or part of it.

Day 4 Teaching
Children read Claws with the teacher. Together they identify the features, and then focus on similes and metaphors, discussing the idea of comparison, direct and implied.
Activity
Children look at pictures of different animals and then use comparisons to describe these. They use similes and metaphors in their own writing.

SPAG
Unit 2 SPaG: Tense: present and past progressive and perfect form
(suggested as 3 days)

You Will Need

Poems
(All in resources)
Night Prowler by Jennifer Curry
The Fox's Foray by Anonymous

Useful Texts
Animal Poems by Jennifer Curry

Websites
For Day 1: Urban foxes from www.YouTube.com.
For Day 2: Friendship with a fox from www.bbc.co.uk.

Presentations
SPaG: Grammar and Punctuation

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Show and read Night Prowler and discuss, asking if children have seen or heard of urban foxes. Share the video clip on urban foxes and briefly discuss. Display and go through the PowerPoint on simple present/past tenses and progressive form, doing the exercises.
Activity
Children work with a compatible partner to change sentences into the progressive form. They re-write each sentence, using the correctly matching tense and then adding additional clauses if appropriate.

Day 2 Teaching
Re-read the poem and then watch a short video clip. Children draft a poem in the same style as that read. Use the PowerPoint on Tenses to learn about the present perfect form of the past tense. Do the exercises as you go.
Activity
Children look at pictures and write descriptive sentences, using the perfect form. They revise how to form this and say each sentence orally before writing it.

Day 3 Teaching
Enlarge and display two poems: The Fox’s Foray and The Fox was running…. Explain that children will be writing their own poem, using the present progressive and the perfect form of the past tense. Identify both these tenses in the poems.
Activity
Children work together to compose 3 or 4 sentences about the fox using the progressive form of the verb in each. They then write 3 or 4 sentences using the perfect form of the verb. Children then work individually to improve their sentences.

SPaG: Grammar and Punctuation

Tenses Powerpoint
Revise simple past and present tense verbs. Look at the present and past progressive forms and how they are used to indicate the action is continuing. Learn how the present perfect form is used. Includes exercises to practise using these different forms.

Comprehension
Unit 3 Comprehension: Reading animal poems, comparing and creating an anthology
(suggested as 5 days)

You Will Need

Texts
Animal Poems compiled by Jennifer Curry

Poems
Message for the Mosquito who shares my bedroom by Pie Corbett
Pelican Pelican by Celia Warren
Escapades by Michaela Morgan
The Sloth by Colin West
Iguana by Paul Cookson
Mice by Rose Fyleman
Additional poems (see resources)

Websites
For Day 1: Make a simple book from www.YouTube.com.

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Explain that, over the next week, children will create and publish their own anthology of poetry about animals. Each day they will read a variety of poems, discuss their features and select one to include in their anthology. Show the first set of poems and identify their features.
Activity
Children in a group share the poems and take turns to read each one in pairs. They discuss the features of each poem and each select one poem to write nicely in their anthology.

Day 2 Teaching
Display and read a poem. Discuss what it is that makes us like a poem. Display Why I like this poem best (see resources). Ask a child to choose a speech bubble they agree with. Have a discussion about the features which appeal to different children and why.
Activity
Again share the poems for the day amongst each group of children. They discuss the poems in pairs and each select one to write in their anthology. They must give a reason for their choice.

Day 3 Teaching
Enlarge and display Message for the Mosquito Who Shares my Bedroom from Animal Poems. Discuss its features and then display Mice. Have a discussion about which children prefer. Explain that today they will select another poem for their anthology and learn it by heart.
Activity
Children sit in groups according to poem chosen from today’s selection. They write their chosen poem in their anthology, using good handwriting. They recite their poem several times, silently or very softly, so as not to disturb others who are learning their poems.
Day 4 Teaching
Enlarge, read and discuss in turn Sloth and Iguana and Escapades. Each poems plays with language in one way or another. Talk about how this can make us see the animal in a new way.
Activity
Once again children choose a poem from a selection provided – all of these use language play. They write their favourite in their anthology. They need to make sure that they use the appropriate writing style to make the playfulness clear – e.g. writing text upside down, or using italics.

Day 5 Teaching
Enlarge and read Pelican Pelican from Animal Poems. Discuss the features of the poem – rhyme, rhythm, format. Put children in pairs. Say that each child has to make a note on their white board of their score for the poem out of 5. Discuss the basis for our scores.
Activity
Spread out the poems for each day on different tables. Children rotate around the tables in order. Each child must select two poems to write in their anthology and complete it. Make sure that they write both poems neatly and with clear handwriting. They do not want to spoil their anthologies!

SPAG
Unit 4 SPaG: Identifying and using adverbs to modify verbs and adjectives
(suggested as 3 days)

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Show and read together The Cow. Discuss the poem. Share BBC video clip on the farmer who loves cows. Display PowerPoint on Adverbs Slides 1 to 10. Ensure that children understand that adverbs tell us something more about verbs. Rehearse how we can add adverbs to tell us HOW, WHEN or WHERE an action happens or an event occurs.
Activity
Children work with a compatible partner. Give out the Exercise sheet: Loving cows.
They work through the exercise, working with their partner to identify and add the adverbs, and to say whether they tell us more about time, place or cause.

Day 2 Teaching
Display and read the poem Sheep in Winter. Discuss how different this is from The Cow. Discuss features and take a vote on which children prefer. Display PowerPoint on Adverbs Slides 11 to the end. Ensure that children realise that adverbs can modify adjectives as well as verbs.
Activity
Hand out the Animal Adjectives and Adverb sheets. Children should have one each but can work in pairs. Children discuss each animal description. Some suggested adverbs are provided on the cards below the descriptions. But children can also think of their own.

Day 3 Teaching
Revisit slides 9 and 10 from the PowerPoint: Adverbs. Make sure children recognise how adverbs modify verbs. Then revisit slides 14 and 15 to rehearse how adverbs also modify adjectives. Show video clip 'Peter the rabbit has some unlikely friends' from www.bbc.co.uk and read together the Rabbit Poem.
Activity
Children read and enjoy 3 or 4 poems together, giving their opinion as to which poem they prefer and justifying it. They then work together to do an adverb search on some extracts from these poems.

SPaG: Grammar and Punctuation

Adverbs and how to use them PowerPoint
Understand how adverbs can modify verbs, adjectives and other adverbs. Consider where to place the adverb in a sentence and learn how to punctuate correctly when using adverbs.

Composition
Unit 5 Composition: Reading animal poems; writing a poem based on those read
(suggested as 4 days)

You Will Need

Texts
Animal Poems by Jennifer Curry

Poems
The Whale's Hymn by Brian Patten (see resources)
Additional poems (see resources)

Planning and Activities

Day 1 Teaching
Show The Whale’s Hymn from Animal Poems. Discuss this poem and children’s reactions. Remind children of the features of poetry from Units 1 and 3, and rehearse these. Show the other poems children will be reading today and discuss.
Activity
Set out the poems so children in a group can share them and take turns to read each poem in pairs. Display Features to look for where children can see it. They discuss the features of each poem with a partner, and each select their favourite poem to write out nicely.

Day 2 Teaching
Children discuss what made them choose the poem they wrote out yesterday. They refer to features. Explain that they will be writing a poem in response to this poem. So today we shall make some notes about our responses to our chosen poem – how it makes us feel and how it makes us see the animal in a new way.
Activity
Children work with others responding to the same poem, with several copies of that poem on each table. Use What do I feel? Prompt sheets (see resources). Encourage children to use it to stimulate their thoughts. They write a sequence of sentences responding to their chosen poem.

Day 3 Teaching
Today children will start writing their poem. Discuss which endangered animal or bird each child will choose. Agree the purpose of our poem. We will want it to affect the reader – to make them sad that this animal is endangered, and to want to help us protect it.
Activity
Display Helpful Words. Children start planning their poem. Stress that, at this stage, they are just writing ideas – phrases, descriptions. Encourage them to use expanded noun phrases and also adverbs in their writing. These help them to describe something exactly as they wish to. Each word in their poem needs to be carefully chosen.

Day 4 Teaching
Discuss how children felt they got along yesterday. Remind children that writing a poem is not quick or easy. We will need to have tried out several versions of each line. Today they will start with what they did yesterday and improve it. Stress that poems do not need to be long, but they do need to persuade the reader of the value of the animal or bird.
Activity
Children return to their poems from yesterday. They read these quietly but aloud to themselves. They make improvements to particular words or phrases. Once they are happy with their poem, they write it out in best, using neat, legible handwriting.