Browse Sets

Block D - Gardens

This is a lively and fun topic to teach children fieldwork and observational skills as they study the geography of their schools, the grounds and the key human and physical features of the surrounding environment.

Children build upon their knowledge of plants and growing. Learn what plants need to grow, why our natural spaces are important and visit a local garden. Buzz with excitement as you learn about bees, get the chance to grow some bee friendly plants and create your own small world gardens!

This Topic is written for Key Stage 1. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

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01: Inspiring spaces

Children will begin these sessions being inspired by the painting Dream of Arcadia. They will learn about conservation and be encouraged to think about natural spaces around their local area.

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02: Through the window

Children will go on a picture journey with the story `Window´ then find out what´s outside their classroom window. They will visit a local garden learning what grows in the local area.

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03: Save the bees!

Children will plant an imaginary seed in their class garden; they will learn why bees are so important and grow some bee friendly plants.

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04: Mary, how does your garden grow?

Children will meet Mary, examine seeds and learn what they need to grow. They will create their own small world gardens and display their work in a class garden centre.

Block E - The Park

This is a lively and fun topic to teach children fieldwork and observational skills as they study the geography of their schools, the grounds and the key human and physical features of the surrounding environment.

Through a series of lively activities children will build upon their knowledge of parks in their local area. With the help of Steve Backshall they will explore features of parks and develop their geographical skills. Children will make a park model and present their research and findings in a park exhibition!

This Topic is written for Key Stage 1. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

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01: Children playing in the park

Steve Backshall introduces the sessions and the class challenge: To research their local park and how to improve it! Children begin by examining the painting Children in the Park by Paul Dupuy, exploring the features of parks and their likes and dislikes.

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02: Let's go to the park - field work

Visit the local park. Start with a scavenger hunt, use maps, compass points and directional language to explore the grounds. Make a vox-pop video and test the playground!

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03: Park maps

Children get to grips with maps! Steve teaches children about map symbols and keys. Children make a map of their local park and help a toy find some treasure!

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04: Improving the park

Children will use straws, cardboard, wool and tape to make human/physical features for a park model.

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05: Park exhibition

Children will present their research and work Steve Backshall style- with enthusiasm! They will think about how they can campaign to change an aspect of their local park.

Block B - Our Playground

This is a lively and fun topic to teach children fieldwork and observational skills as they study the geography of their schools, the grounds and the key human and physical features of the surrounding environment.

Learn about playgrounds with Dora the explorer. Gather information through field work, orienteering, measuring and map activities. Explore playgrounds in other parts of the world and learn a playground game. Draw pictures of your ideal playground and campaign for a playground improvement.

This Topic is written for Key Stage 1. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

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01: Explore playgrounds with Dora

Children meet Dora the explorer. Dora has been learning all about playgrounds and has travelled the world collecting information. Children will travel the globe with Dora, they will examine playgrounds in other locations, show Dora their playground games and learn new ones along the way.

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02: Learn about playgrounds with Dora

Dora wants to learn all about your school playground! Children will take part in a series of engaging playground activities and field work.

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03: Draw playgrounds with Dora

Dora asks children what their ideal playground would look like. Children will think about creating an outside space with places to think, learn and exercise. They will draw pictures of their ideal playground and present their work to the School Council for a simple change to be made.

Block A - Our School

This is a lively and fun topic to teach children fieldwork and observational skills as they study the geography of their schools, the grounds and the key human and physical features of the surrounding environment.

Rosie the Hen takes a walk around the farmyard and then takes a second walk around our school! Plot a route for her and then answer her questions about the unique history of the school and its locality before carrying out a travel and traffic survey to answer more of Rosie’s questions.

This Topic is written for Key Stage 1. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

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01: Rosie's first walk

Bossy puppet gives directions and/or instructions to create a route. Children devise own route and record as a plan.  ‘Rosie’s Walk’ by Pat Hutchins.

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02: Rosie's second walk

Rosie takes a 2nd walk around our school!  She’s occasionally a little naughty and might run in the corridor, skip around the hall or knock on HT’s door and run away! Devise a route for Rosie.

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03: Rosie's questions

Can we answer Rosie’s questions about our school? But first we have to go on an egg hunt to find the questions, hidden in the outside learning area!

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04: I-Spy!

Invite visitors to share their local knowledge of school. Produce ‘I Spy’ booklets to highlight historical or geographical features of our school.

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05: Travel to school survey

Rosie’s noticed none of the children have wings – how do they get to school? They obviously can’t fly (as Rosie would!)

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06: Traffic survey

Rosie’s received a letter from a friend who is coming to visit! Friend doesn’t drive – how can they get to school? Which vehicles drive past our school?

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07: Time machine!

Wow! Rosie’s friend owns a time machine! Friend’s next visit is to the future! What will the schools be like then?

Block M - Host Country

Are you excited about a major sports tournament that is about to start? This topic takes the inspiration of a range of major sports including football, rugby, athletics, cycling, tennis and cricket to generate some fantastic learning opportunities. Learn about the origins and development of popular sports and their most important tournaments over time and stimulate some fantastic history learning. Find out about where sporting tournaments are taking place and which countries will be taking part and prompt some impressive geography learning. Research and discuss the values upheld by different sporting organisations; stage your own class tournaments and hone your PE skills. You will find a host of creative learning activities within these 12 blocks that capitalise on the energy and enthusiasm that great sports events stimulate.

Look at a host country or a country taking part in a tournament and find out about its location in the world, its main cities and geographical features; explore the country. Research what life would be like for a child in the country you are studying, experience some of the foods eaten there and the languages spoken.

This Topic is written for Lower Key Stage 2. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

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01: Researching a country

Look at a host country or a country taking part in a tournament and find out about its location in the world, its main cities and geographical features. Explore the country using Google Earth and Google Maps. This session includes a case study of Brazil (host nation for 2014 FIFIA World Cup and 2016 Olympic Games).

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02: A day in the life

Research what life would be like for a child in the country you are studying, experience some of the foods eaten there and the languages spoken. Present that information in a 'Day in the Life of' documentary. This session continues the case study of Brazil, giving examples of Brazilian food recipes and what it would be like to live as a child in a Brazilian city and a remote part of the Amazon jungle.

Block L - Tour de France

Are you excited about a major sports tournament that is about to start? This topic takes the inspiration of a range of major sports including football, rugby, athletics, cycling, tennis and cricket to generate some fantastic learning opportunities. Learn about the origins and development of popular sports and their most important tournaments over time and stimulate some fantastic history learning. Find out about where sporting tournaments are taking place and which countries will be taking part and prompt some impressive geography learning. Research and discuss the values upheld by different sporting organisations; stage your own class tournaments and hone your PE skills. You will find a host of creative learning activities within these 12 blocks that capitalise on the energy and enthusiasm that great sports events stimulate.

Look at the history of the Tour de France and how it compares to the modern event. Learn something of the areas the Tour travels through and find out what it is like to compete in the modern Tour. Take a look behind the scenes at the support teams involved, and consider the importance of teamwork to enable success.

This Topic is written for Lower Key Stage 2. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

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01: The route

Look at the history of the Tour de France and how it compares to the modern event. Become familiar with the route on a map and learn something of the areas the Tour travels through. Make an origami Tour jersey.

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02: The race

Find out what it is like to compete in the modern Tour by getting to know the riders of Team Sky. Take a look behind the scenes at the support teams involved, and consider the importance of teamwork to enable success. Make cycling energy bars with instructions by Simon Richardson, British professional cyclist.

Block K - History of Cycling

Are you excited about a major sports tournament that is about to start? This topic takes the inspiration of a range of major sports including football, rugby, athletics, cycling, tennis and cricket to generate some fantastic learning opportunities. Learn about the origins and development of popular sports and their most important tournaments over time and stimulate some fantastic history learning. Find out about where sporting tournaments are taking place and which countries will be taking part and prompt some impressive geography learning. Research and discuss the values upheld by different sporting organisations; stage your own class tournaments and hone your PE skills. You will find a host of creative learning activities within these 12 blocks that capitalise on the energy and enthusiasm that great sports events stimulate.

Learn about the history of cycling from the first road bikes of 1817 to the concept bikes of the present day; find out about the British cycling team and the development of cycling as a sport; design, build and race your very own mini concept bike.

This Topic is written for Lower Key Stage 2. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

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01: Road cycling

Learn about the history of cycling, what the first road bicycles looked like and how they have developed. Research members of the British cycling team and get to know what cycling for their country means to them. Design a concept bike and discuss improvements with peers.

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02: Off-road cycling

Study a timeline of bike design and the development of off-road cycling as a sport. Get to know some Britons who partake in off-road cycling for their country and what that might mean for them. Start to build, from a design, a concept bike.

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03: Bike race

Design and make your own concept bike and be part of a downhill race of mini concept bikes. Recreate the spectator experience and cheer on the competitors. Understand what it may feel like to compete, wearing the GB team kit.

Block H - Cricket Tournaments

Are you excited about a major sports tournament that is about to start? This topic takes the inspiration of a range of major sports including football, rugby, athletics, cycling, tennis and cricket to generate some fantastic learning opportunities. Learn about the origins and development of popular sports and their most important tournaments over time and stimulate some fantastic history learning. Find out about where sporting tournaments are taking place and which countries will be taking part and prompt some impressive geography learning. Research and discuss the values upheld by different sporting organisations; stage your own class tournaments and hone your PE skills. You will find a host of creative learning activities within these 12 blocks that capitalise on the energy and enthusiasm that great sports events stimulate.

When did cricket become a professional sport with worldwide competitions? When did the Ashes start and why is it called that? What other cricket tournaments take place? Find out about these cricket tournaments in this block and finally hold your own Twenty20 cricket tournament!

This Topic is written for Lower Key Stage 2. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

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01: Official bodies and rules

Find out about the first official cricket club in Marylebone in London and how it used to rule cricket. Play a game of cricket using the first Code of Laws created in 1744.

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02: Ashes and World Cup

Find out about the Men’s and Women's Ashes and World Cup. Take part in role-plays of some of the famous events from the early days of these tournaments.

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03: Twenty20

Learn about Twenty20 cricket in preparation to play a game of it. Agree a code of conduct based on commonly held values that the class agree on.

Block G - History of Cricket

Are you excited about a major sports tournament that is about to start? This topic takes the inspiration of a range of major sports including football, rugby, athletics, cycling, tennis and cricket to generate some fantastic learning opportunities. Learn about the origins and development of popular sports and their most important tournaments over time and stimulate some fantastic history learning. Find out about where sporting tournaments are taking place and which countries will be taking part and prompt some impressive geography learning. Research and discuss the values upheld by different sporting organisations; stage your own class tournaments and hone your PE skills. You will find a host of creative learning activities within these 12 blocks that capitalise on the energy and enthusiasm that great sports events stimulate.

Learn about the history of cricket: where it got its name, where was it invented and how has it changed over the centuries. From its origins as a children's game, it gained popularity as a game for adults and eventually the game spread from England to places that Britain took over as part of the British Empire, which was the basis for several controversies.

This Topic is written for Lower Key Stage 2. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

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01: When and where?

Research the history of cricket, including protective equipment, from historical drawings and sources. Discuss where you think cricket was invented. Play French cricket.

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02: The Empire Years

Explore the ramifications of the British Empire in terms of its effects on cricket and annotate a map with this historical information. Learn about the rivalry between India and Pakistan after Partition, and how South Africa was banned from competing over apartheid. Write speeches about the potential for sport to bring people together or increase competitiveness.

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03: Howzat

Make and play a cricket dice game to explore how maths is used in cricket to either present information using an appropriate graphical method or in working out batting and bowling averages to rank players and teams.

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04: Play the game

Play a game of cricket, modifying the rules as appropriate and given what children already know about managing the risk of playing this game. Keep track of batting scores to work out batting averages.

Block A - History of Athletics

Are you excited about a major sports tournament that is about to start? This topic takes the inspiration of a range of major sports including football, rugby, athletics, cycling, tennis and cricket to generate some fantastic learning opportunities. Learn about the origins and development of popular sports and their most important tournaments over time and stimulate some fantastic history learning. Find out about where sporting tournaments are taking place and which countries will be taking part and prompt some impressive geography learning. Research and discuss the values upheld by different sporting organisations; stage your own class tournaments and hone your PE skills. You will find a host of creative learning activities within these 12 blocks that capitalise on the energy and enthusiasm that great sports events stimulate.

Be inspired by an upcoming athletics event. Use this block to teach children about the history of athletics and to make a timeline of key events, research specific aspects of athletic history, use hot-seating and role-play to learn about the achievements of Roger Bannister. Read motivational quotes from athletics and discuss what motivates athletes to succeed.

This Topic is written for Lower Key Stage 2. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

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01: Athletics history

Create an overview of athletic history and research some specific aspects of athletic history. Learn about the achievements of Roger Bannister and his contribution to athletics, through hot-seating, role play and research.

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02: Motivations and goals

Discuss what motivates athletes to succeed. Hot-seat Eric Liddell and explore what motivated him to run and to compete. Understand that athletes in the spotlight can have a significant impact on the culture around them for a variety of reasons. 

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03: Playground athletics

Hot-seat Paula Radcliffe and understand her motivations to compete. Examine the skills needed by athletes and their training routines. Consider the attitude to health and diet that athletes have and make pledges to live a healthy lifestyle. Look at the variety of amateur athletics events and choose one to research and present to the class.