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Block E - Everyday Life in Baghdad

Track the development and history of an early Islamic civilisation – the great city of Baghdad. Compare and contrast these developments with Western Europe at the same time, learn about the spread of Islam through the Middle East and beyond, and examine trade and everyday life in Baghdad. Finally discover the legacy of early Islam and the continuing influences we see today.

Ask questions about everyday life in Baghdad through hot seating; recreate scenes from everyday life in Baghdad through creating ‘tableaux’; find out about parallel aspects of life in London and Baghdad. Evaluate quality of life in those two cities; examine a range of sources of historical evidence relating to ancient Baghdad, evaluating their usefulness and reliability; collaborate as a group to plan and create an informative film to present to a wider audience.

This Topic is written for Upper Key Stage 2. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

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01: Who were the citizens of Baghdad?

Learn about the citizens of Baghdad and their daily life. Demonstrate their knowledge through role play such as ‘hot-seating’ and tableaux (freeze-framing).

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02: Dark Age or Golden Age

Explore what life was like in both London and Baghdad c. CE 1000, then using the evidence uncovered decide which of the two cities they would have preferred to live in during this time.

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03: Believe it or not?

In this session, children will learn about examining sources of historical evidence and then rate this information for reliability.

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04: Movie-Makers 1

In this session, children will take their knowledge that they learned during the previous sessions to plan an informative film about a chosen element of life in Baghdad c. CE 900.

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05: Movie-Makers 2

Continuing from the previous session, children will source images and record commentaries for their film.

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06: Movie-Makers 3

The final session in this series, children will edit together the images and sound recordings to produce the completed film, before presenting it to an audience.

Block B - The Rise of Islamic Civilisation

Track the development and history of an early Islamic civilisation – the great city of Baghdad. Compare and contrast these developments with Western Europe at the same time, learn about the spread of Islam through the Middle East and beyond, and examine trade and everyday life in Baghdad. Finally discover the legacy of early Islam and the continuing influences we see today.

Become an expert in the rise of the Islamic Civilisation; compare ancient and modern maps of the world and the region significant to early Islamic Civilisation; use a range of sources to discover more about the life of Muhammad (pbuh); put together a chronological account of the life of Muhammad (pbuh) using ICT ‘soundbite’ news clips; find out about the difficult time following the death of Muhammad (pbuh); summarise the key events of early Islamic conquests and place them on a timeline.

Note – Hamilton Trust uses the form ‘Muhammad (pbuh)’ where he is mentioned. This follows a general convention and is seen by some as a mark of respect. It is up to individual teachers as to whether they follow this convention in written and spoken materials.

This Topic is written for Upper Key Stage 2. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

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01: Crazy Cartography

Compare ancient and modern maps of the world and the region.

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02: Discover: the life story of Muhammad (pbuh)

Use a range of sources to discover more about the life of Muhammad (pbuh).

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03: Record: the life of Muhammad (pbuh)

Put together a chronological account of the life of Muhammad (pbuh) using ICT ‘soundbite’ news clips.

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04: Division and conflict

Find out about the difficult time following the death of Muhammad (pbuh).

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05: The spread of Islamic Civilisation

Summarise the key events of early Islamic conquests and place on a timeline.

Block A - Introduction to an Early Islamic Civilisation

Track the development and history of an early Islamic civilisation – the great city of Baghdad. Compare and contrast these developments with Western Europe at the same time, learn about the spread of Islam through the Middle East and beyond, and examine trade and everyday life in Baghdad. Finally discover the legacy of early Islam and the continuing influences we see today.

 This block looks at the early history of Islamic civilisation including Baghdad from CE 900 on a broad brush scale and compares it to what was going on in western Europe at around the same time. This block touches on the effects of religion on culture and architecture, the development and maintenance of global trade networks and the history of intellectual and philosophical thought in both areas.

Note – Hamilton Trust uses the form ‘Muhammad (pbuh)’ where he is mentioned. This follows a general convention and is seen by some as a mark of respect. It is up to individual teachers as to whether they follow this convention in written and spoken materials.

This Topic is written for Upper Key Stage 2. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

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01: Trade

Explore how Baghdad was the centre of a trade network that extended from China to Ireland, and from Scandinavia to sub-Saharan Africa. Illustrate maps with trade routes, transportation methods and goods traded.

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02: Religion

Compare the spread of Christianity across the Middle East, Africa and Europe to the spread of Islam in overlapping areas but later centuries, and create an animation, including images of specific buildings.

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03: Achievements

Sort the achievements of western Europe and the Islamic world and use your knowledge to create a comparative timeline. Highlight where Islamic thought has influenced Europe e.g. universities, architecture, maths etc...Make a blog post, podcast or infographic to share your research.

Block D - The Rise and Fall of Baghdad

Track the development and history of an early Islamic civilisation – the great city of Baghdad. Compare and contrast these developments with Western Europe at the same time, learn about the spread of Islam through the Middle East and beyond, and examine trade and everyday life in Baghdad. Finally discover the legacy of early Islam and the continuing influences we see today.

Find out about the fascinating rise and fall of the city of Baghdad CE 900; explore Islamic art, patterns and motifs, turning the classroom into a House of Wisdom.

Note – Hamilton Trust uses the form ‘Muhammad (pbuh)’ where he is mentioned. This follows a general convention and is seen by some as a mark of respect. It is up to individual teachers as to whether they follow this convention in written and spoken materials.

This Topic is written for Upper Key Stage 2. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

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01: Baghdad: The round city

Use a ‘Round Robin’ research task to build awareness of ancient Baghdad.

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02: Interior designers

Build a resource bank of features of Islamic Art.

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03: Art or maths?

Explore and create tessellating patterns, link to Islamic designs and meanings.

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04: Our House of Learning

Translate knowledge of tessellating patterns to computing applications.

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05: War comes to Baghdad

Learning about the Mongol Invaders and linking it to modern day. 

Block C - Trade and Travel

Track the development and history of an early Islamic civilisation – the great city of Baghdad. Compare and contrast these developments with Western Europe at the same time, learn about the spread of Islam through the Middle East and beyond, and examine trade and everyday life in Baghdad. Finally discover the legacy of early Islam and the continuing influences we see today.

Discover the importance of the ‘silk road’ and ‘spice routes’ and the goods which were carried along them, map the origins of these goods. Design and make a board game based on the ‘silk road’ to illustrate the flow of goods and knowledge, the hazards of trade and life on the road in a caravan. Create replica artefacts for a class bazaar and share this with invited ‘traders’!

This Topic is written for Upper Key Stage 2. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

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01: Silk, spice and all things nice

Discover that the ‘silk road’ and ‘spice routes’ were important ancient highways for trade; enjoy first-hand experience of some of these goods.

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02: There and back again

Formulate the basis of a game simulating the journey along the ‘silk road’.

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03: Game time!

Finalise and make their board games; play each other’s games and evaluate their success.

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04: Design and make (1)

Make a close study of an Islamic artefact and translate this to a plan for a 3D replica.

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05 and 06: Design and make (2)

Create chosen artefact and decorate. Evaluate against design criteria. N.B. This will need to be spread across a week to allow for drying time.

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07: Set out your stall

Organise and set up a ‘bazaar’, including acting as merchants and selling goods.

Block A - The Maya in Context

Study the fascinating Maya in this vigorously researched topic. Discover where and when the Maya built their magnificent civilisation as you develop a range of skills across the curriculum. Investigate how they lived, their culture and their legacy. Compare their lives to your own as you bring your learning together.

This block puts the development of the Maya civilisation into context within a world setting, and especially in contrast with contemporary developments in Britain. Compare the history and effects of invasion in both areas and the survival of the Maya and Anglo-Saxon culture.

This Topic is written for Upper Key Stage 2. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

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01: Achievements

Sort the developments of the Maya and the Anglo-Saxon cultures accurately and compare the achievements of both.

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02: Invasion

Take part in role-plays to explore how invasion affected both the Maya and Anglo-Saxon cultures.

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03: Legacy

Find out about the legacy of the Maya and Anglo-Saxon culture, and how they are remembered today.

Block G - Kenya

This is a lively and fun topic to teach children fieldwork and observational skills as they study the geography of their schools, the grounds and the key human and physical features of the surrounding environment.

Country Mouse and City Mouse encourage children to learn about Kenya. Learn key geographical vocabulary and carry out map work. Build a picture of Kenya through a series of activities such as role play and hot seating, wellington gardens & making clay furniture. Gather research for an informative brochure and take part in `The City & Countryside Debate´.

This Topic is written for Key Stage 1. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

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01: City mouse and country mouse

Children will listen to the story `City Mouse and Country Mouse´ by John Wallner. They will look at images of Kenya´s cities and countryside then use websites to start a class brochure about Kenya.

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02: Country mouse and city mouse learn about the city

Children will watch a clip about Nana, a child in urban Kenya, then through drama explore the similarities and differences between Nana´s life and their own.

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03: City mouse and country mouse learn about the country

Learn what daily life is like in the countryside of Kenya by meeting Evangeline, a child living on a farm in Naro Maru. Participate in `The City and Countryside Debate´ - it´s time to vote, but will children prefer?

Block F - Local Land Use

This is a lively and fun topic to teach children fieldwork and observational skills as they study the geography of their schools, the grounds and the key human and physical features of the surrounding environment.

The pirates want to play! Map the local area to locate parks and playgrounds; is there enough play space to satisfy pirates’ play needs to prevent them becoming mischievous? What shops do we have in our locality? One pirate wants an ice-cream, another a comic and a third new boots – where can we buy these items? The classroom becomes a ‘miniature village’ as local businesses are reproduced. Finish by working together to produce a trail around the locality. Celebrate learning with a presentation to parents and carers.

This Topic is written for Key Stage 1. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

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01: Treasure hunt

Pirates use treasure map to hunt and find treasure! We’re going on a treasure Hunt; we’re going to find a sparkly one.

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02: Pirate code

Decipher the pirate code to learn about coordinates!

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03: What do you think?

The pirates want to play! Use Google earth and map of the local area to locate parks and playgrounds; is there enough play space to satisfy pirates’ play needs to prevent them becoming mischievous?

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04: Shopping!

What shops do we have in our locality? One pirate wants an ice-cream, another a comic and a third new boots – where can we buy these items?

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05: What are you doing today?

The class room becomes a ‘miniature village’ as local businesses are reproduced in role play and small world.

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06: Walk around our locality!

Work together to produce a trail around the locality. What sounds might you hear on your way? Celebrate learning with a presentation to parents and carers.

Block G - Rulers

This topic provides you with an outstanding set of inspired plans and resources to enable you to study Benin (West Africa) c. AD 900-1300 and to contrast many of its features with contemporary developments in British history; learn about the rise and establishment of the Benin Kingdom, consider what brought the Edo people to the rainforests of Benin and how the empire grew; study the rulers of the Edo people, their everyday life, their religion and worship, their trading currencies and trade routes, their music and art and finally how the Kingdom of Benin came to an end.

Find out about the Oba of Benin and the structure of government. People gave tributes to the Oba through their representative chiefs. Learn how all the rulers were generally men, but the mother of the Oba was always considered to be very important.

This Topic is written for Upper Key Stage 2. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

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01: Ogisos and Obas

Find out about the Ogisos and Obas and the roles they played in society. Learn about named Obas and what they achieved for Benin.

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02: The mother of the Oba

Find out about how the mother of the Oba was revered and sometimes played a large role in the running of the kingdom. Design a game to explore the life of Queen Idia.

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03: Chiefs, soldiers, freemen and slaves

Learn how the Edo speaking people of Benin were either soldiers in the Oba's army, freemen farming or crafting, or slaves. Discuss the ethics of slavery.

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04: Rule of law

Explore how this structure of society, as well as the religion, kept a check on crime and corruption. Re-enact a court of law with everyone taking on different roles in society.

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05: Make a hierarchy tree

Make a hierarchy tree showing the relationships between people in the kingdom of Benin.

Block E - Everyday Life

This topic provides you with an outstanding set of inspired plans and resources to enable you to study Benin (West Africa) c. AD 900-1300 and to contrast many of its features with contemporary developments in British history; learn about the rise and establishment of the Benin Kingdom, consider what brought the Edo people to the rainforests of Benin and how the empire grew; study the rulers of the Edo people, their everyday life, their religion and worship, their trading currencies and trade routes, their music and art and finally how the Kingdom of Benin came to an end.

Create Benin houses and streets; imagine what it was like to live among the Benin people; investigate Benin music and story telling; make a Benin asologun (stringed instrument) and/or egion (musical bow); take part in a recital; explore Benin cast iron objects and their meanings; have a go at casting; learn about the types of food people ate in Benin and try out some traditional recipes.

This Topic is written for Upper Key Stage 2. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

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01: Benin houses

Learn how the people of Benin made houses. Make a Benin house out of sticks, clay and leaves. Create a class Benin city by setting out the streets in long straight lines, just like the ancient city of Benin. Imagine what it would be like to live among the Benin people.

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02: Music and story

Investigate the music of the time and understand the importance of music in the Benin culture. Learn that they did not have a written language and children did not go to school, but instead, in the evening, the people in each village would collect around the village square or family hearth and tell stories. Make a Benin asologun (stringed instrument) and/or egion (musical bow), and take part in a recital.

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03: Benin art

Understand that one of the most unique things about the Benin civilisation was their art. Explore their cast bronze objects. Understand that their art had symbolic meanings and were made by skilled craftsmen. Have a go at casting or making a hip mask, bell, or figurine and present them in an assembly.

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04: Benin food

Learn about the types of food people ate in Benin and try out some traditional recipes. Eat!