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Block C - Animal Protectors

Animals are always fascinating to children and this topic details numerous creative and exciting learning activities inspired by this stimulus.

How can we help to protect animals? Find out about the role of different charities including zoos in conserving rare breeds and animals. Explore the tasks of animal keepers and train to be an Animal Protector: learning about the right habitats, living conditions and appropriate food and water amounts for the animals. Great opportunities to explore some maths ideas about size, volume and patterns.

Think about the ways we can help our local animals to thrive by creating wildlife areas and gardens at school and home. Make observations and use drawing, painting and sculpture to share your ideas. Create wildlife homes for hedgehogs and frogs. Choose and plant flora that encourage wildlife.

The Topic Overview outlines the outcomes and objectives of the whole topic, with more specific detail, including resources lists, provided in the Block Overview.

This Topic is written for Reception. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

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01: How do we protect?

Introduce endangered animals and think about the part humans play in this. Watch a video clip on habitats and endangered animals and find out ways to help. Small world animal sorting, matching fur to animal, painting, using instruments to be different animals.

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02: So you want to be an animal protector?

Begin training to become an animal protector by learning what we need to be happy and safe and comparing this to what an animal needs. Learn about what foods different animals need. Measure food by weighing, making grape snakes, sorting unhealthy and healthy food and ordering sizes of bowls.

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03: Water training!

Continue with their Animal Protector training and learn how important water is to animals and us. Measure and compare capacities. Order containers, make animal footprints in paint and watch a video clip of elephants learning to use their trunk in water.

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04: Habitat training

Complete the last phase of the Animal Protector training and become fully qualified protectors. Learn about different habitats and where animals might live. Sort animals into habitats and make their own books.

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05: Local animal protectors

Explore local wildlife and act out how the animals might move and travel. Guess the animal game. Create a class dance about these animals. Sketch with detail observations, make salt dough animals, label different animals, find them in non-fiction and guess the animal nose!

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06: Save our wildlife!

Watch a video about British wildlife and their habitats. Discuss local changes that may have affected their local wildlife. Transform the outside classroom into a wildlife area and become local animal protectors by planting wild flowers, making hedgehog homes, bird food and ponds!

Block B - Working Animals

Animals are always fascinating to children and this topic details numerous creative and exciting learning activities inspired by this stimulus.

Find out about the animals that work and help us in so many ways. Learn about the strong animals that help us to do heavy and difficult jobs such as heavy horses and elephants. Learn about how dogs can help people who have problems with seeing or confidence. Learn about animals that can identify and track scents or deliver secret messages. Take part in role-plays, listen to stories and represent ideas with art and design and technology. Express learning through writing and speaking.

The Topic Overview outlines the outcomes and objectives of the whole topic, with more specific detail, including resources lists, provided in the Block Overview.

This Topic is written for Reception. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

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01: How am I helpful?

Meet Super Worm! Use role-play to recreate different ways he is helpful and give suggestions about how the children can be helpful in different situations.

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02: Strong and mighty!

Children discover a heavy object in their classroom. They learn how horses and elephants have been trained to move heavy items and compare and contrast this with machines.

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03: Help me to see it!

Children understand how dogs are able to help blind/partially-sighted people to move around safely. They learn how to care for a dog and know the difference between pet dogs and working dogs.

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04: Detectives!

Children use their sense of smell to identify a range of familiar scents. They know that dogs can be trained to identify and track scents. Children know that dogs can be used to help increase confidence and self-esteem.

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05: Secrets!

Children understand how pigeons have been used to transport secret messages. They consider which animal they think is the most helpful and provide a reason for their choice. Children vote to discover the most helpful working animal!

Block A - Pets

Animals are always fascinating to children and this topic details numerous creative and exciting learning activities inspired by this stimulus.

What pets do you have at home? How do you care for them? What habitats do they need to help them thrive? How does a vet help animals? Do you know about exotic pets? Which pets did people have in the past? This block will help you to answer these questions and to show your learning through art, design and technology, music, role-play, stories, maths and writing. Have fun holding an animal picnic, a Great Pet Sale and a ‘Best in Show’ event.

This Topic is written for Reception. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

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01: All sorts of pets

Wonder at a surprise egg, think about good/bad pets in response to a letter from the little girl in the story I want a pet, set up a pet shop role-play area with posters and pet food.

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02: Exotic pets

Discuss exotic pets, make posters, paper chain snakes, playdough snakes, and junk model exotic habitats.

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03: Pets in the past

Look at pictures of pets in the past and compare with pictures of pets in the present, make pet portraits, collage of pets from the past, make a lead and tag for soft pet, listen and dance to old music.

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04: Great pet sale!

Listen to The Great Pet Sale by Mick Inkpen, take part in pet shop sale, pay for animals, write price tags, draw out mathematical language and make zig-zag books.

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05: Looking after our pets

Look after the newly arrived class pet, listen to a vet, discuss how vets help animals, role-play being a vet, weigh pets, measure out ‘medicine’ and bandage injuries.

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06: Pet picnic!

Bring in your toy pets to join the class pet show, award rosettes for different reason, choose your favourite pet, draw your pet’s favourite food on a paper plate ready for the final picnic, read the thank you letter from the girl in the story.

Block F - Culture and Art

Children learn about life in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age, a period covering a million years of history. As well as understanding the chronology of this fascinating time, children will learn about the food, religion, homes, technology and art and how each of these areas developed and changed over time and how amazing developments occurred from the Stone Age to the Iron Age.

Learn about the fascinating culture and art of prehistoric people. Research art and music in prehistory; make Ice Age art and replica art objects from the Neolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages; make replica musical instruments; take part in an improvised performance using the musical instruments you have made and present your work in an assembly.

This Topic is written for Lower Key Stage 2. We also have an Upper Key Stage 2 Topic on Stone Age to Iron Age which is suited to that age range in its outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as National Curriculum objectives. If you want to use this material for any other age range, you will need to consider how to adapt it appropriately.

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01: Introduction to culture and art

Find a cave in the classroom decorated with art. What could the art mean?

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02: Ice Age art and music

Research Palaeolithic art and paint and sculpt as Ice Age artists would have. Make and play a Stone Age flute.

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03: Neolithic art and music

Find out that there was a taboo about depicting humans in the Neolithic art, and learn how to carve replica objects. Make and play replica drums.

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04: Bronze Age art and music

Research Bronze Age artistic expression on metalwork and make replicas. Make replica Bronze Age horns and play them.

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05: Iron Age art and music

Research Iron Age artistic expression in metalwork and make replicas. Convert their Bronze Age horns into carnyxes.

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06: Performance

Take part in an improvised performance of their prehistoric instruments for an assembly.

Block E - Homes and Everyday Life

Children learn about life in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age, a period covering a million years of history. As well as understanding the chronology of this fascinating time, children will learn about the food, religion, homes, technology and art and how each of these areas developed and changed over time and how amazing developments occurred from the Stone Age to the Iron Age.

Learn about the development of homes and settlements from the Stone Age to the Iron Age. Investigate life as a villager. Research daily tasks, recreate houses, weave with wool, and share learning with others using whole-class role-play.

This Topic is written for Lower Key Stage 2. We also have an Upper Key Stage 2 Topic on Stone Age to Iron Age which is suited to that age range in its outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as National Curriculum objectives. If you want to use this material for any other age range, you will need to consider how to adapt it appropriately.

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01: Introduction to homes and everyday life

Find materials for a replica home in the class/on the field and reconstruct it. Discover what evidence archaeologists use to reconstruct buildings or settlements.

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02: Hunter-gatherer homes

Investigate reconstructed hunter-gatherer homes. Design and make a model hunter-gatherer home and learn how to make cordage.

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03: Neolithic farmers' homes

Research what Neolithic homes looked like and design and make a model Neolithic home.

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04: Must Farm

Research the Bronze Age settlement at Must Farm and make replica objects from the site to use as props in a 'freeze the scene' photograph. Also learn how to weave.

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05: Roundhouses

Research Iron Age roundhouses in order to design and make model roundhouses. Learn about and how to do wattling.

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06: Prehistoric role-play

Take part in a whole-class role-play of a village in prehistory.

Block D - Religion and Ritual

Children learn about life in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age, a period covering a million years of history. As well as understanding the chronology of this fascinating time, children will learn about the food, religion, homes, technology and art and how each of these areas developed and changed over time and how amazing developments occurred from the Stone Age to the Iron Age.

Research the development of religion in prehistory; design and build a replica Stonehenge from cheese puffs or biscuits; make replica objects to use as props; re-enact possible scenes from prehistoric religious ceremonies; and make a video/audio lecture about the development of religion in prehistory.

This Topic is written for Lower Key Stage 2. We also have an Upper Key Stage 2 Topic on Stone Age to Iron Age which is suited to that age range in its outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as National Curriculum objectives. If you want to use this material for any other age range, you will need to consider how to adapt it appropriately.

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01: Introduction to Stone Age to Iron Age religion and ritual

Learn about religious beliefs in prehistory and why a totem pole has appeared in the classroom/field.

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02: Hunter-gatherer beliefs

Explore the evidence that suggest some people in the Palaeolithic and Mesolithic probably pretended or believed that they could turn into animals and back again. Make props and improvise a scene.

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03: Neolithic religion and Stonehenge

Learn about how Stonehenge developed over 1500 years and how and why it was built. Find out whether there are any other monuments like Stonehenge from the Neolithic. Devise and make a replica Stonehenge from biscuits.

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04: Sun and water

Find out how religion changed over the course of the Bronze Age, from sun to water worship, and how we know. Make replica decoration or tools and re-enact a possible scene from the Bronze Age.

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05: Druids

Research whether the druids were real, and, if so, what they did. Debate the results of research and then re-enact a possible druidic ritual.

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06: Lecture

Make a video or audio lecture or discussion about the development of religion in prehistory, with some re-enactments to help viewers understand.

Block C - Technology, Tools and Inventions

Children learn about life in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age, a period covering a million years of history. As well as understanding the chronology of this fascinating time, children will learn about the food, religion, homes, technology and art and how each of these areas developed and changed over time and how amazing developments occurred from the Stone Age to the Iron Age.

Learn about the amazing development of technology and inventions from the Stone Age to the Iron Age and speculate why these changes came about. Make a museum of replicas of inventions made in prehistory including prehistoric pots, and try an alternative to bronze-casting and iron-forgingmaking your own collection of edible prehistoric tools from sugar rock, chocolate and pastry.Finally, report your work using digital technology.

This Topic is written for Lower Key Stage 2. We also have an Upper Key Stage 2 Topic on Stone Age to Iron Age which is suited to that age range in its outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as National Curriculum objectives. If you want to use this material for any other age range, you will need to consider how to adapt it appropriately.

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01: Introduction to technology, tools and inventions

Sort through objects to work out which of them was invented in prehistory. Find out when and where in prehistory certain inventions were made and add them to a timeline.

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02: Invention of fire and stone tools

Find out different ways to make fire, and devise a safe experiment with magnesium. Learn about the first stone tools and make replicas from potatoes, chocolate or sugar rock.

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03: Invention of pottery and ground stone tools

Learn about the invention of pottery and make replica pots. Devise an experiment to test how long it takes to polish a stone axe.

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04: Invention of bronze

Find out how bronze is made and devise a way to safely replicate casting a bronze tool from chocolate, ice or jelly. Make replica bronze tools or gold jewellery from gold foil.

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05: Invention of iron

Devise a way to twist, fold and flatten dough to make sword or spearhead shapes with pattern welds, like Iron Age weapons. Make replica weapons with silver foil.

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06: Scientific report

Write a report about all the scientific experiments carried out and the results.

Block B - Food

Children learn about life in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age, a period covering a million years of history. As well as understanding the chronology of this fascinating time, children will learn about the food, religion, homes, technology and art and how each of these areas developed and changed over time and how amazing developments occurred from the Stone Age to the Iron Age.

Learn about the amazing development of food and cooking from the Stone Age to the Iron Age. Learn about the course of events that might have led Stone-Age people to move from hunting and gathering to farming. Demonstrate your knowledge through performance, a feast and an informative display.

This Topic is written for Lower Key Stage 2. We also have an Upper Key Stage 2 Topic on Stone Age to Iron Age which is suited to that age range in its outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as National Curriculum objectives. If you want to use this material for any other age range, you will need to consider how to adapt it appropriately.

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01: Introduction to food

Find out how we know about food in Stone Age to Iron Age Britain, by looking at animal bones found on site to the last meal of Lindow Man.

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02: Hunting and gathering

Find out what kinds of animals hunters killed in the Palaeolithic and Mesolithic, what plants they gathered, and make a prehistoric stew.

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03: Farming appears

Learn about the coming of farming in the Neolithic and what early farming was like. Make butter from cream and make bread.

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04: Bronze Age beans

Learn about the Bronze Age and how many more crops were introduced at this time. Make oatcakes and a bean stew.

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05: Iron Age feast

Learn about Iron Age feasting and create lots of food for a feast based on knowledge of prehistoric food.

Block A - Introduction to Stone Age to Iron Age Britain

Children learn about life in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age, a period covering a million years of history. As well as understanding the chronology of this fascinating time, children will learn about the food, religion, homes, technology and art and how each of these areas developed and changed over time and how amazing developments occurred from the Stone Age to the Iron Age.

Investigate how we know about Britain’s prehistory and make a basic timeline with the main dates of the periods in Stone Age to Iron Age Britain. Take part in a mock investigation, participate in class debates, create group timelines, play matching games and be inspired to write some powerful non-fiction writing.

This Topic is written for Lower Key Stage 2. We also have an Upper Key Stage 2 Topic on Stone Age to Iron Age which is suited to that age range in its outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as National Curriculum objectives. If you want to use this material for any other age range, you will need to consider how to adapt it appropriately.

 

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01: Being archaeologists

Carry out a mock investigation to find out how we know about Stone Age to Iron Age Britain.

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02: Start off the timeline

Make a basic timeline with the main dates of the periods in Stone Age to Iron Age Britain marked on it.

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03: The Stone Age

Learn about the Stone Age, add some details to that bit of the timeline, and find out what makes the Neolithic so different from the rest of the Stone Age. 

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04: The Bronze Age

Learn about the Bronze Age and add detail to the timeline. Write a report exploring what life might have been like for someone in the Bronze Age.

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05: The Iron Age

Learn about the Iron Age and add detail to the timeline. Debate what hillforts were for.

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06: Story-time

Write a non-fiction piece about prehistory explaining things that have been learned during this block.

Block H - Commonwealth Day

Learn about events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally: events commemorated through festivals or anniversaries. Choose from our series of lively and creative blocks: find out about key commemorative days such as Remembrance Day, Bonfire Night, Thanksgiving Day, the first aeroplane flight, Shakespeare’s birthday, the Monarch’s official birthday, important National Days and Commonwealth Day.

Can you help to celebrate Commonwealth Day in March? Start this block with an important visit from the monarch and listen as they set a special challenge. Learn through a series of creative activities: Create a Commonwealth collage, take part in traditional games from Commonwealth countries and design a unique Commonwealth flag. Finally, come together and celebrate your achievements with a friendly Commonwealth Day!

This Topic is written for Key Stage 1. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

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01: Message from the Monarch

Be amazed by a visit from the monarch, who sets a special challenge. Learn about the history of the Commonwealth and the values it stands for, then create a Commonwealth collage!

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02: Commonwealth Children

Learn what life is like for children in different countries of the Commonwealth. Try playing some of the games that originate in Commonwealth countries.

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03: Commonwealth Flags

Examine the 53 flag designs from Commonwealth Countries. Learn why colours and pictures are used on certain flags. Design a unique flag for the Commonwealth.

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04: Commonwealth Day

Consolidate and celebrate the learning throughout this block. Children host an invited audience to celebrate their learning. The monarch congratulates children.