Sports Tournaments

Block L - Tour de France

Are you excited about a major sports tournament that is about to start? This topic takes the inspiration of a range of major sports including football, rugby, athletics, cycling, tennis and cricket to generate some fantastic learning opportunities. Learn about the origins and development of popular sports and their most important tournaments over time and stimulate some fantastic history learning. Find out about where sporting tournaments are taking place and which countries will be taking part and prompt some impressive geography learning. Research and discuss the values upheld by different sporting organisations; stage your own class tournaments and hone your PE skills. You will find a host of creative learning activities within these 12 blocks that capitalise on the energy and enthusiasm that great sports events stimulate.

Look at the history of the Tour de France and how it compares to the modern event. Learn something of the areas the Tour travels through and find out what it is like to compete in the modern Tour. Take a look behind the scenes at the support teams involved, and consider the importance of teamwork to enable success.

This Topic is written for Lower Key Stage 2. If you want to use this Topic for a different Key Stage, you will need to consider how to adapt the outcomes, content, delivery methods, resources and differentiation, as well as the relevant National Curriculum objectives.

Supporting documents for topic
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01: The route

Look at the history of the Tour de France and how it compares to the modern event. Become familiar with the route on a map and learn something of the areas the Tour travels through. Make an origami Tour jersey.

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02: The race

Find out what it is like to compete in the modern Tour by getting to know the riders of Team Sky. Take a look behind the scenes at the support teams involved, and consider the importance of teamwork to enable success. Make cycling energy bars with instructions by Simon Richardson, British professional cyclist.