Rhymes

Rhymes for Year 3

These Rhymes are excellent for encouraging speaking and listening. Easily learned by heart, they make a very useful support to the development of memory and of comprehension when reading short texts. Children can perform these Poems or Rhymes, or they can simply read, learn and enjoy them.

Supporting documents for set
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Broken Promises

Wounds are healed, stains are washed And shoes made new and bright... There are three verses each with four lines of alternating rhyming. A good starting point for a discussion about trust, how most things are easy to mend except for promises.

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Children, Children

Children, children, Yes Papa? Where have you been to? Grandmamma... This is a traditional Caribbean rhyme in the style of a question and answer dialogue, sixteen lines long.Two children or two groups of children could recite this.

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Foreign Lands

Up into the cherry tree Who should climb but little me?... A poem by R.L. Stevenson told in five verses each with four lines of rhyming couplets. A child observes his world from high up in a tree.

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Gelert Acrostic

Gelert the great, faithful hound Eyes always scanning for danger, ears... An acrostic poem about a faithful dog named Gelert who met with an unfortunate ending.

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Gelert Haiku

Gelert was the hound, Trusted carer of the child, Killed in swift anger. Three haiku verses about the poor unfortunate dog named Gelert. A great way to reinforce syllables.

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Gelert Kennings Sound

This is a recording of a rendition of the previous rhyme, Gelert Kennings. Children could change the tone of their voice as demonstrated to reflect the pairs of describing words.

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Gelert Kennings Sound

This Rhyme can be used for memorisation or as an example of a classic or traditional poem.

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Gelert Kennings

Cry maker Horse stopper Heart melter Tail wagger.... This rhyme takes the form of a list poem, with many ways of describing Gelert Kennings the dog. Children could use this as an example to compose a poem about their own pet or a favourite character.

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Gelert Rhyming Couplets

Faithful Gelert, gentle, mild Guard your charge, the sleeping child.... Four pairs of rhyming couplets about Gelert Kennings. Children could compare these different poetic styles about Gelert.

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King of the Beasts

‘King of the Beasts’ they call him, Stronger than any is he... There are four verses each containing four lines. The second and fourth are the same, like a chorus and the rhyming pattern differs from the first and third.

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St Jerome

St Jerome in his study kept a great big cat, It’s always in his pictures, with its feet upon the mat... There are four pairs of rhyming couplets in this rhyme about St Jerome and his affinity for cats.

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Teddy Bear

Teddy bear, teddy bear, Touch your nose, Teddy bear, teddy bear, Touch your toes... A lovely rhyme in two verses with lots of repetition making it easy to memorise; simple actions can be added, too.

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Ten in the Bed

There were ten in the bed, And the little one said, “Roll over! Roll over!”... This rhyme contains lots of repetition and counting down from 10 to 1. When we arrive at one in the bed, the verse changes.

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The Eagle

He clasps the crag with crooked hands; Close to the sun in lonely lands, This rhyme by Alfred Lord Tennyson contains two verses each with three rhyming lines. Children could search for alliteration and find the powerful verbs used. Why do children think the eagle 'falls' at the end?

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The Moon1

The moon has a face like the clock in the hall; She shines on thieves on the garden wall... A poem by R.L. Stevenson told in four verses with rhyming couplets. This rhyme could act as an introduction to the differences between night and day.

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Trees

Birch and pine, beech and hazel

Willow, sycamore, ash and maple....

This is a rhyme in four verses with rhyming couplets. We learn a lot about the characterisitics of a tree in general as well as learning the names of several.

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The New Moon

Dear mother, how pretty The moon looks to-night!... This rhyme is an excerpt from The New Moon by Eliza Lee Follen. There are three verses and the child describes what she would love to do if she could go up and sit on the crescent.

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The Pobble Who Had No Toes

The Pobble who has no toes Had once as many as we... An entertaining nonsense poem in six verses by Edward Lear. We learn about creatures called a Pobbles and the mystery of their missing toes.

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The Star

Twinkle, twinkle, little star, How I wonder what you are! Three more verses have been added to this traditional nursery rhyme, in the same rhyming pattern as the first verse.

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The Wild Princess

Once upon a time in a faraway land, There lived a princess called Tiger-lin... This poem tells the story of how a princess wished to choose her own husband. The verses change in length and rhyming patterns and can be a little tricky to maintain rhythm.