Rhymes

Rhymes for Year 2

These Rhymes are excellent for encouraging speaking and listening. Easily learned by heart, they make a very useful support to the development of memory and of comprehension when reading short texts. Children can perform these Poems or Rhymes, or they can simply read, learn and enjoy them.

Supporting documents for set
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An Elephant

An elephant goes like this and that, He’s terribly big, And he’s terribly fat... A funny six-lined rhyme that children to which could add simple actions.

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Beneath the Sea

Beneath the sea, come swim with me, let me take you there. There are five verses each with four lines. There is repetition as each alternate line begins 'Beneath the sea..'. Children could guess what or who is inviting them into the sea.

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Brian the Lion

Lions should hunt Antelope And live on fresh raw meat.... There are three verses each with four lines with alternating rhymes. Brian is an unusual lion and learns his lesson about eating too many sugary foods!

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Crow's Nest

By the gold in this chest By the blade of this knife... There are 16 lines with alternate rhyming and repetition, as shown in the first two lines. Children could reflect the tone of the pirate's voice and his perceived facial expressions when reciting this rhyme.

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Dinosaur

Prehistoric fever, Dream weaver. There are eight simple and effective pairs like this which act as excellent revision when learning about dinosaurs. Some children may be able to create their own rhyming pairs along these lines.

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From a Railway Carriage

Faster than fairies, faster than witches, Bridges and houses, hedges and ditches... This rhyme is from A Child’s Garden of Verses, by Robert Louis Stevenson. There are eight pairs of rhyming couplets describing the way scenery seems to fly past during a train ride.

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I Saw a Ship a-Sailing

I saw a ship a-sailing, a-sailing on the sea... There are four verses each with alternating rhyming lines. We learn of some unusual crew on this particular ship.

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I sent a Letter to my Love

I sent a letter to my love And on the way I dropped it... Three verses describe the journey of this love letter and the lines are alternating rhymes.

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If all the World were Paper

If all the world were paper And all the sea were ink... There are three verses each with four lines with alternating rhyming. The first and third lines always begin with 'If' as the rhyme is about what would happen if things were very different in the world.

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If You Ever

If you ever ever ever ever ever If you ever ever ever meet a whale.... There are two verses of six lines. There is a lot of repetition of the words 'ever' and 'never'. Children will need to concentrate hard to recite the correct number in each line!

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King of the Beasts

‘King of the Beasts’ they call him, Stronger than any is he.... There are four verses each containing four lines. The second and fourth are the same, like a chorus, and the rhyming pattern differs from the first and third.

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Mrs Lynn

Mrs Lynn is very thin, Mr Pratt is very fat.... There are six short lines like this, which could be added to by the children in order to work on adjectives.

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My Shadow

I have a little shadow that goes in and out with me, And what can be the use of him is more than I can see.. This rhyme is from ‘A Child’s Garden of Verses’ by Robert Louis Stevenson. Told in two verses, each contains eight lines of rhyming couplets, describing the changes a child sees in their shadow.

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Old MacDonald

Old MacDonald had a farm, E-I-E-I-O! And on that farm he had some cows, E-I-E-I-O! The ever popular nursery rhyme can be added to by the children with their own choice of animals and sounds. The animals could be replaced with letters and their sounds to reinforce phonics work. e.g. And on that farm he had a G.....

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Salt, Mustard, Vinegar, Pepper

Salt, mustard, vinegar, pepper, French almond rock... Two verses each containing eight lines of alternating rhyming. This is often used as a skipping chant.

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Ship Ahoy!

The pirate boat carried me Sailing over the wide blue sea… This rhyme contains sixteen lines of rhyming couplets with most pairs of lines beginning in the same way, providing some simple and helpful repetition.

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Six Little Mice!

Six little mice sat down to spin Pussy passed by and she peeped in... Three verses of six rhyming couplets tell the story of six mice who won't be caught out by scheming puss! Children will notice that there is a pattern to how each verse goes, by looking at the first few words of each line.

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Tasty Fish

Would you like some tasty fish? No, it’s much too bony. There are four verses of alternating rhyming lines, with the repeated pattern of question and answer. Children could recite this in pairs or two groups like a dialogue.

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The Beach

The beach and the sea, The rocks on the shore, So much to see, So much to explore. There are four verses following this rhyming pattern. A good addition to any topic work on beach or marine life.

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The Cherry Tree

Once I found cherry stone, I put it in the ground... This rhyme has two verses with four lines each of alternating rhyming. A good addition to any science topic about plants and their life cycle.

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The Moon

The moon has a face like the clock in the hall; She shines on thieves on the garden wall... A poem by R.L. Stevenson told in four verses with rhyming couplets. This rhyme would act as an introduction to the differences between night and day.

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The New Moon

Dear mother, how pretty The moon looks to-night!... This rhyme is an excerpt from The New Moon by Eliza Lee Follen. There are three verses and the child describes what she would love to do if she could go up and sit on the crescent.

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The Star

Twinkle, twinkle, little star, How I wonder what you are! Three more verses have been added to this traditional nursery rhyme, in the same rhyming pattern as the first verse.

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The Wild Princess

Once upon a time in a faraway land, There lived a princess called Tiger-lin. This poem tells the story of how a princess wished to choose her own husband. The verses change in length and rhyming patterns and can be a little tricky to maintain rhythm.

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Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Bat

Twinkle, twinkle little bat! How I wonder what you’re at! This is a verse from Lewis Carroll's version of Twinkle Twinkle from 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

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Two Little Boats

Two little boats are on the sea, All is calm as calm can be... A very sweet rhyme in eight rhyming couplets about two little boats surviving a storm.